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Local home and flower shows make Super Bowl shuffle

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The company that produces both the Indianapolis Home Show and the Indianapolis Home & Flower Show will conduct the two events together this year due to a scheduling conflict caused by the city’s hosting of the Super Bowl.

Solon, Ohio-based Marketplace Events typically hosts the Indianapolis Home Show in January at the Indiana State Fairgrounds and will do so again this year.

But its upstart event, the Home & Flower Show, held at Lucas Oil Stadium since its inception in 2010, conflicts with the football game and will take place along with the home show this year, said Brent Keller, group manager for the Indianapolis Home Show.

An additional 25,000 square feet of space will be used at the fairgrounds’ South Pavilion to accommodate the Home & Flower Show.

The two shows will run from Jan. 20 through Jan 29. Combined admission for the events is $13 for adults, $3 for children ages 6 to 12, and free for children 5 and younger.

Though Marketplace Events again targeted mid-March for the Home & Flower Show—well after the Super Bowl will be played on Feb. 5—the venue was still off limits, Keller said.

“Other dates were available, but we didn’t want to run a garden show too late in the year,” said Keller, explaining the reason for the one-time combination.

Marketplace Events plans to return the Home & Flower Show to Lucas Oil Stadium next year.

“We saw that as a wonderful venue, and we wanted to produce an event there,” Keller said. “We wanted to gear [a show] toward homes and flowers.”

That show has attracted between 25,000 and 30,000 people in each of its first two years, a much smaller crowd than the roughly 100,000 who annually attend the more established home show.

The Indianapolis Home Show is the nation’s oldest and the Midwest’s largest home-based event, according to Marketplace Events.
 

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