Legal Issues and Fraud and Attorneys and Courts and Law

Convicted Conour, government agree to sale of assets for victims

August 12, 2013

Convicted former attorney William Conour’s possessions in his foreclosed Carmel home, including original artwork and a collection of premium wine and champagne, could be sold with proceeds directed toward a court fund established for victim restitution, according to a joint motion.

If approved by Chief Judge Richard Young of the U.S. Court for the Southern District of Indiana, the assets would be “turned over to the United States Marshal’s Service and/or the Federal Bureau of Investigation to be sold, post-sentencing, in a commercially reasonable manner.”

Proceeds would “be applied to any financial monetary penalties assessed against” Conour, according to the motion signed by Conour and federal prosecutor Jason Bohm. The motion also says Conour’s 25-room home is being foreclosed and utilities disconnected.

Once a leading personal-injury and wrongful-death attorney, Conour pleaded guilty July 15 to a federal charge of wire fraud that carries a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison. The government alleges he defrauded at least 25 clients of more than $4.5 million.

Conour is being held in the Marion County Jail pending sentencing, scheduled for Oct. 17.

The joint motion also includes an inventory of assets the government would sell, but no estimated value. Highlights of the nine-page inventory include several original oil paintings by master Indiana artist C.W. Mundy and a collection of more that 275 bottles of premium wine and champagne, some of which are valued in the hundreds of dollars per bottle.

The inventory also includes household furnishings and a range of items from eight Cryptex Security Boxes to bar accessories including a shuffleboard table and a Golden Tee arcade-style golf video game.

This story originally appeared in The Indiana Lawyer.

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