Editorial

EDITORIAL: Hogsett could spark debateRestricted Content

July 19, 2014
Joe Hogsett’s July 14 announcement that he’ll step down as U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Indiana at the end of the month renewed speculation that he will run for mayor of Indianapolis next year. And to that prospect we can only say, bring it on
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EDITORIAL:Don't be careless with prime siteRestricted Content

July 12, 2014
The Indiana Finance Authority is wise to take its time deciding what might happen to the full square block of surface parking immediately north of the Statehouse.
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EDITORIAL: Choose roadwork based on need, not politicsRestricted Content

July 5, 2014
The City-County Council has turned infrastructure repair into a political battleground, with Democrats and Republicans touting competing proposals for how to finance and assign a vital round of major public infrastructure needs.
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EDITORIAL: Legislate some common sense on cold beer

June 21, 2014
Twenty minutes for a can. Forty minutes for a bottle. That’s how long a semi-scientific study by the website Gizmodo determined it takes to turn a warm beer into a cold one—by using a freezer or putting the beer on ice.
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EDITORIAL: Indianapolis Public Schools must rebuild trustRestricted Content

June 14, 2014
If any local organization needs the public’s trust, it’s Indianapolis Public Schools, considering the challenges the district faces educating often-disadvantaged students.
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EDITORIAL: Students need more advice

June 7, 2014
If you’re not certain whether a school counselor’s primary duty is to review college-application letters, work with troubled students, or proctor AP testing, you’re not alone.
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EDITORIAL: Party conventions not an easy callRestricted Content

May 31, 2014
Count us among those who are skeptical the attendance and media exposure the big political parties draw are worth the cost.
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EDITORIAL: Another Indy building blockRestricted Content

May 17, 2014
There’s little glamour in the tedious work of streamlining and rewriting a grossly outdated zoning code.
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EDITORIAL: Fadness agenda should advanceRestricted Content

May 8, 2014
Fishers voters made their second forward-thinking choice in as many years on May 6 when they picked Town Manager Scott Fadness in the primary election to run as the Republican nominee for mayor.
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EDITORIAL: Justice center move can benefit downtownRestricted Content

May 3, 2014
Most of the conversation surrounding the city’s proposed criminal justice center has focused on what the heart of downtown stands to lose when the courts and jails move out Rarely discussed is what downtown can gain from the new center, which is now officially slated for about a third of the 110-acre GM Stamping Plant site just west of White River.
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EDITORIAL: Fieldhouse lid cracking openRestricted Content

April 19, 2014
After years of insisting that it cannot make ends meet running Bankers Life Fieldhouse, and receiving millions of taxpayer dollars to ease the pain, Pacers Sports & Entertainment has agreed to open its books—somewhat—to city officials, and to the rest of us.
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EDITORIAL: Bike-share cements cycling legacy

April 12, 2014
Mayor Greg Ballard has accomplished plenty during his seven years in office, but his most enduring legacy may be in building a bicycle-friendly Indianapolis.
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EDITORIAL: Find the money to attack crimeRestricted Content

April 5, 2014
By all accounts, Nathan Trapuzzano was the kind of citizen Indianapolis is trying to recruit.
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EDITORIAL: Keep attentive eye on CumminsRestricted Content

March 29, 2014
Last week’s announcement that Cummins would build a headquarters for its global distribution division in downtown Indianapolis was deservedly welcomed for its potential to house as many as 400 well-paid workers and add an “architecturally significant” building to a reserved skyline.
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EDITORIAL: Legislative session created foothold for transitRestricted Content

March 22, 2014
Years of foot-dragging by Indiana legislators has put the Indianapolis region way behind its peers in developing an effective mass transit system. And the transit funding bill that lawmakers finally approved this year contains some maddening conditions. But make no mistake, passage of the bill is a major milestone in a long, difficult fight.
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EDITORIAL: Swing toward sustainabilityRestricted Content

March 15, 2014
Genetically modified crops are not a panacea.
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EDITORIAL: Polytechnic plan makes senseRestricted Content

March 8, 2014
One of the most promising planks in Mayor Greg Ballard’s agenda for the coming years is a new school his staff is calling Indianapolis Polytechnic.
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EDITORIAL: High-earners to the rescueRestricted Content

March 1, 2014
Ballard is on the right track in trying to make the city attractive to people with big incomes.
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EDITORIAL: Push electric deregulationRestricted Content

February 22, 2014
Gov. Pence is smart to begin studying electric utility deregulation, and his trademark cautious, collaborative style could help the state avoid creating more problems than any reform he proposes might solve.
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EDITORIAL: Don’t isolate heart of criminal justice

February 15, 2014
Most everyone agrees that a core function of government is justice—to accurately determine guilt or innocence of the accused and to carry out appropriate punishment.
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EDITORIAL: Roll out red carpet for NRA confabRestricted Content

February 8, 2014
Few trade groups are more polarizing, so city officials, the local hospitality industry and the NRA itself have all been remarkably low-key about the group's upcoming visit.
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EDITORIAL: Commuter tax needs fences

February 1, 2014
Indy Chamber might incite a little road rage by proposing a commuter tax that would allow Indianapolis to collect revenue from those who work in the city but live outside county lines.
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EDITORIAL: Booze regulation needs an updateRestricted Content

January 25, 2014
 IBJ Staff
Someday, perhaps not too many years from now, Indiana will have liquor laws that are well-reasoned and rationale.
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EDITORIAL: Marriage debate wastes our timeRestricted Content

January 18, 2014
 IBJ Staff
Among the many good arguments for not putting Indiana through an expensive and embarrassing battle over same-sex marriage, one gets little attention: amending the Constitution to prohibit it won’t matter in the long run.
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EDITORIAL: Forge ahead with preschoolRestricted Content

January 11, 2014
Gov. Mike Pence said last month that he wants to help young children from low-income homes start kindergarten “ready for a life of learning.” We applaud that goal, and ask the governor and General Assembly to craft voucher legislation that encourages the highest-quality preschools.
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  1. Apologies for the wall of text. I promise I had this nicely formatted in paragraphs in Notepad before pasting here.

  2. I believe that is incorrect Sir, the people's tax-dollars are NOT paying for the companies investment. Without the tax-break the company would be paying an ADDITIONAL $11.1 million in taxes ON TOP of their $22.5 Million investment (Building + IT), for a total of $33.6M or a 50% tax rate. Also, the article does not specify what the total taxes were BEFORE the break. Usually such a corporate tax-break is a 'discount' not a 100% wavier of tax obligations. For sake of example lets say the original taxes added up to $30M over 10 years. $12.5M, New Building $10.0M, IT infrastructure $30.0M, Total Taxes (Example Number) == $52.5M ININ's Cost - $1.8M /10 years, Tax Break (Building) - $0.75M /10 years, Tax Break (IT Infrastructure) - $8.6M /2 years, Tax Breaks (against Hiring Commitment: 430 new jobs /2 years) == 11.5M Possible tax breaks. ININ TOTAL COST: $41M Even if you assume a 100% break, change the '30.0M' to '11.5M' and you can see the Company will be paying a minimum of $22.5, out-of-pocket for their capital-investment - NOT the tax-payers. Also note, much of this money is being spent locally in Indiana and it is creating 430 jobs in your city. I admit I'm a little unclear which tax-breaks are allocated to exactly which expenses. Clearly this is all oversimplified but I think we have both made our points! :) Sorry for the long post.

  3. Clearly, there is a lack of a basic understanding of economics. It is not up to the company to decide what to pay its workers. If companies were able to decide how much to pay their workers then why wouldn't they pay everyone minimum wage? Why choose to pay $10 or $14 when they could pay $7? The answer is that companies DO NOT decide how much to pay workers. It is the market that dictates what a worker is worth and how much they should get paid. If Lowe's chooses to pay a call center worker $7 an hour it will not be able to hire anyone for the job, because all those people will work for someone else paying the market rate of $10-$14 an hour. This forces Lowes to pay its workers that much. Not because it wants to pay them that much out of the goodness of their heart, but because it has to pay them that much in order to stay competitive and attract good workers.

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  5. It is sad to see these races not have a full attendance. The Indy Car races are so much more exciting than Nascar. It seems to me the commenters here are still a little upset with Tony George from a move he made 20 years ago. It was his decision to make, not yours. He lost his position over it. But I believe the problem in all pro sports is the escalating price of admission. In todays economy, people have to pay much more for food and gas. The average fan cannot attend many events anymore. It's gotten priced out of most peoples budgets.

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