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House committee votes to nix Common Core

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A measure to stop Indiana from using the Common Core national education standards has been advanced by a legislative panel.

The House Education Committee endorsed the bill in a 10-2 vote Thursday. The Senate previously approved the measure 36-12.

The legislation came amid debate over whether Indiana should continue following the standards that have been adopted by 45 other states or create its own benchmarks to prepare students for college and careers after high school.

Indiana halted implementation of Common Core to more grades last year in order to study whether to drop the standards, but the bipartisan panel that looked into the issue failed to reach a consensus.

The bill now goes to the full House for consideration.

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  • Rick's Comments Show Ignorance of CC
    Rick I Illustration of Pervasive Ignorance - I read Rick's comments with frustration. He does not know what he is talking about but represents the uninformed views of many Hoosiers. First, this is not a Federal program; it was developed by Governors and education groups. Second, it is not about testing; rather, it is about teaching critical thinking and providing a common framework of education as students move among districts and or states. I could go on but you get the picture. Having an uninformed group of legislators make these decisions is frustrating to watch.
  • government
    SM - you do bring up a good point, which is that local and state governments are often equally as corrupt. Most of us on here have said, get the federal govt out of education. I'm going to strike the word 'Federal' and just simply say: get government out of the education business. Teachers unions must also go. If those two goals can be accomplished, we will begin to see improvement.
  • Common Core trainwreck
    My wife and I have studied Common Core for the last couple of years, and for the first time in my life we chose to stand up against this. I was on the DOE website last year well before documents were removed describing testing methodology, plans etcs, it was like right out of a George Orwell book. When my children brought home the math, it was the initial concern. Lets learn addition and move on. If 5 + 4 = ? was the question, and they wrote 8, but because in common core you have to write how you got your answer. If you did that, then 8 was correct. That is the tip of the iceberg. Box 10, crazy math. When reviewing testing methodology of the DOE, which I read it with my own eyes. It was disturbing. My wife and I both have college degrees and are professionals and we didn't take this lightly. Common Core standards testing requirements, all set up by very large educational, technological, and Foundations with an agenda. Federal control of our local schools....Scary Scary stuff.
  • correction
    Before Executive jumps on me, "administratives" should have been "administrators."
  • You missed the point
    The point is that all of the states should use the same curricula. If you are more comfortable replacing my list with "Texas, Florida, Montana, North Dakota, etc.," my point remains the same. It is a disservice to be doing something different because all of these kids will end up competing with each other some day. If Indiana's legislators or administratives have better ideas than everyone else (which I doubt), great--let's have every state implement them. As for keeping education at the local level, that's where it is and has been, and that is the system that is currently failing.
    • Lib knee-jerks......
      One only has to read the posts from self-proclaimed liberals to experience the result from the application of 'progressive' standards to the educational process. I knoe (sic) this to be true....Concerned parents and taxpayers have driven a stake through the heart of this out-of-state financed monster..an amazing result considering the nearly uniform lack of intestinal fortitude displayed by the alleged leadership of the main stream Republicans in the House and Senate.
    • Seriously?
      "Frankly, I place more confidence in the federal standards and the people creating them than I do in the state. " I for one don't have much confidence in bureaucrats in Washington. I'd rather keep policy on such items to a much more local level of discussion. "Schools in Indiana should be teaching our kids the same things taught in Illinois, Michigan, New York, California, and elsewhere. We are doing them a disservice by doing anything less." Why would doing something different than these failing states be a disservice? You picked a pretty pathetic group of states to say we need to be doing the same as. I would prefer to do the opposite of these states on most every issue especially eduacation. Education in this country is a big problem in my opinion and it all starts by giving a few people the reins in D.C. to decide how all of our children should be taught. How about us here at the local level have a say in how are kids are taught.
      • Reality
        I have a daughter in kindergarten and a son in second grade in Carmel, which is already implementing many of the Common Core standards. I have not seen anything like what you are suggesting--that kids have to explain in 10 steps why 2+2=4. I agree with you that kids in the early grades are being asked to do more not than I think they have in the past, but, as long as it's not taken to the extreme, that is a good thing. I don't think anyone can honestly say that our kids have been learning too much in school over the last few decades! Moreover, pulling out of the Common Core does not represent a movement away from centralized bureaucracy. The state legislature simply wants to replace the centralized standards created by the federal government with centralized standards created by the state. Frankly, I place more confidence in the federal standards and the people creating them than I do in the state. Most of us have no idea what our state legislators, administrative appointees or school board members are doing or whether they are qualified to dictate our kids' educations. Lastly, we live in an increasingly global economy. People are more transient than ever. The idea that local school boards or even states, for that matter, should dictate curricula is an outdated relic that no longer fits the world in which we live. Schools in Indiana should be teaching our kids the same things taught in Illinois, Michigan, New York, California, and elsewhere. We are doing them a disservice by doing anything less.
        • common core
          Besides the fact that they are completely convoluted (Have you ever tried to help a sixth grader with a common core math problem?) and are arcane in their methods, there are many reasons why Common Core is a bad idea. They are reasons which have absolutely nothing to do with the Tea Party. The Common Core Standards are a set-up for national standardized tests, tests that can’t evaluate complex thought, can’t avoid cultural bias, can’t measure non-verbal learning, can’t predict anything of consequence (and waste boatloads of money). Under Common Core, students will be taught at levels that are developmentally inappropriate. i.e. what used to be taught in second grade will need to be taught in Kindergarten. This is already happening. There is not a need to explain in 10 steps WHY 2+2=4. It just is. There are basic hard and fast rules (especially in Math) that simply should be accepted. It simply is not possible for 1+1 to equal 3. Further, there is no modified or equivalency test for students with special needs. Centralized education programs have not worked and will never work. The quality of education has only declined over the past few decades. The solution is to get the federal government out of the education business and to get the unions out of the schools.
          • Help Me Out
            I read disdain for the TEA Party, but I cannot find a single post that explains why Common Core is wrong. I would be willing to wager that most voters know absolutely nothing about Common Core. Way back in the 50's and 60's, Indiana schools were training students for one of three pathways; college, post high school technical training, or auto industry related jobs. Today, fast food restaurants have computers that identify the correct change to return to the customer. Sophisticated Manufacturing Facilities have trouble finding qualified workers due to a complete lack of mathematic skills required to operate computer controlled manufacturing systems. I would be also be willing to wager that most members of the House could not explain the requirements for Common Core at each grade level. I encourage IBJ to interview as many Members of the House as possible, and present the facts regarding a "Failure To Understand Common Core" and why most of their votes are based on the opinions of lobbyists.
          • Tea Party bogeymen
            All this angry name calling and hysteria over Tea Party is very amusing. It's nice to see how effective this movement has become. Get used to it, because another election is near.
          • good call
            The Common Core standards are no good for Indiana. Good job.
          • Dumb political stunt and nothing more
            What a waste of time. The opponents of the Common Core don't even know what it is or why they oppose it. They only knoe that the Tea Party opposes it and by golly if they are agaimst it, it must be evil. When will this state elect some adults?

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