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INSIDE DISH: Tulip Noir owner learns as she goes

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Inside Dish

Welcome back to IBJ’s video feature “Inside Dish: The Business of Running Restaurants.”

Our subject this week is Tulip Noir, a north-side breakfast and lunch cafe opened in late 2008 by novice restaurateur Dina M. Romay-Sipe. Frustrated and unhappy in her career as an interior designer, Romay-Sipe, 48, took a three-month break to reevaluate her goals and began hatching her plan for the eatery.

"I started driving around and looking for spaces," she said. "I had put a menu together. I was baking. I was making all kinds of things, dropping them off to my neighbors."

Romay-Sipe knew what she was getting herself into. She grew up in a restaurant family; her mother was a chef and her father ran the front of the house for a steak-and-seafod restaurant in Toledo, Ohio. Her love of cooking stems from her childhood years helping her mother in the kitchen. But the restaurant industry also left an indelible stain on her youth.

"It's a tough life," she said. "It's extremely tough on family. It broke up our family. My mother would work all the time. ... I don't remember life with my father. He never had time."

Determined to keep her current home life healthy—and not just via the natural and organic offerings that dominate her menu—Romay-Sipe limited Tulip Noir to breakfast and lunch so she could be available to her family for the rest of the day. (She and her husband, architect Jeff S. Sipe, have three children: twin boys, 19; and a 15-year-old daughter.)

Although she grew up with parents in the industry, she had a lot to learn about the restaurant business as she developed Tulip Noir and opened its doors. In the video below, Romay-Sipe details the intensive research she did in advance of opening; what she learned from mentors; and the missteps that she regrets.


 

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Tulip Noir
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1224 W. 86th St.
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(317) 848-5252
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www.tulipnoircafe.com
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Concept: Breakfast and lunch cafe focusing on organic and natural products.
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Founded: Nov. 4, 2008
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Majority owner: Dina M. Romay-Sipe
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Head chef: Kim Cruz
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Start-up costs: $180,000
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2009 sales: $300,000
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Seating: 48
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Goals: Continuing to find inexpensive and creative ways to market the restaurant; possibly offering cooking classes and beginning an outreach program to area schools focusing on nutrition.
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Good to know: Tulip Noir does not offer dinner, principally because Romay-Sipe insists on being home with her family for dinner. She and her husband, Jeff S. Sipe, have three children: twin boys, 19; and a 15-year-old daughter. Sipe works out of an office at the restaurant and keeps the books for the eatery.
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  • Tulip Noir Is A Real Treat
    My fiance and I have been visiting Tulip Noir on weekends for quite some time now. We always sit at the counter so we can chat with Dina and the staff. We highly recommend Dina's famous scones and the French toast (both types). They are absolutely fabulous! The food is consistently delicious, and the staff is courteous and knowledgeable. The atmosphere is warm and friendly, and the decor is modern and fun. We have referred many people to Tulip Noir and will continue to do so as long as Dina is at the helm. We wish her all the success in the world!
  • Tulip Noir
    I just wanted to congratulate Dina on an outstanding new restaurant. I currently reside in the far northeast corner of Fishers. A girlfriend of mine lives on the far west side of Indy. We love meeting there. The staff is outstanding and her twin sons are absolutely marvelous. They are extremely knowledgeable and so willing to make everything perfect. We love going there. Thank you. It is a special place to come and enjoy great fresh foods and new dishes and outstanding baked goods. My favorite thing is trying the new pressed coffees and teas. I also love the decor.
  • A MUST
    We love Tulip Noir, were just there this weekend. Most amazing food - love the expanded menu, great atmosphere, and wonderful service. It's a great place to take new clients or contacts for brunch as an alternate to the busy lunch hour. We wish Dina much success!!!

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  1. I am so impressed that the smoking ban FAILED in Kokomo! I might just move to your Awesome city!

  2. way to much breweries being built in indianapolis. its going to be saturated market, if not already. when is enough, enough??

  3. This house is a reminder of Hamilton County history. Its position near the interstate is significant to remember what Hamilton County was before the SUPERBROKERs, Navients, commercial parks, sprawling vinyl villages, and acres of concrete retail showed up. What's truly Wasteful is not reusing a structure that could still be useful. History isn't confined to parks and books.

  4. To compare Connor Prairie or the Zoo to a random old house is a big ridiculous. If it were any where near the level of significance there wouldn't be a major funding gap. Put a big billboard on I-69 funded by the tourism board for people to come visit this old house, and I doubt there would be any takers, since other than age there is no significance whatsoever. Clearly the tax payers of Fishers don't have a significant interest in this project, so PLEASE DON'T USE OUR VALUABLE MONEY. Government money is finite and needs to be utilized for the most efficient and productive purposes. This is far from that.

  5. I only tried it 2x and didn't think much of it both times. With the new apts plus a couple other of new developments on Guilford, I am surprised it didn't get more business. Plus you have a couple of subdivisions across the street from it. I hope Upland can keep it going. Good beer and food plus a neat environment and outdoor seating.

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