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Kroger convinces council member of need for gas station

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Kroger Co. will add a gas station to its store at West 86th Street and Township Line Road after successfully lobbying an Indianapolis City-County Council member who'd threatened to stand in its way.

Councilor Jose Evans, whose Pike Township district includes the Willow Lake shopping center, had promised to hold up approval on Monday evening by calling for a full hearing before the council if Kroger couldn’t compromise on the station's location within the plaza. The Metropolitan Development Commission already had approved the grocer's plans in a 5-4 vote, and the council typically affirms most MDC zoning decisions without further hearings.  

Cincinnati-based Kroger has made gas discounts for loyalty-card shoppers a key piece of its market strategy, and it’s in the process of adding gas stations to as many stores as possible.

Evans decided to support the Kroger gas station after visiting the store Sunday and talking with customers. He also met Monday morning with Kroger’s legal, real estate and lobbying team. “It’s in the best interest of my district to support this gas station,” Evans said. “This was a hard decision.”

Facing opposition on the council, local Kroger President Bob Moeder wrote a letter to customers, which was available in the store along with plan drawings for the gas station, or “fuel center.”

“Kroger stores that lack a pharmacy or fuel center are dramatically less competitive than those that have them,” Moeder’s letter said. “This can make the difference between a profitable store and a failing store. In other words, approval of this fuel center also is about protecting the investment Kroger has made in the existing store and the 106 associates who work there.”

While Kroger says the store could fail without a gas station, spokesman John Elliott told IBJ he could not "specifically say, no fuel center means [a] closed store.”

Council member Angela Mansfield, who represents a section of Washington Township near the store, asked for a hearing on the matter Monday, but her motion died without a second motion, and the council OK'd the project.

Mansfield said she'd heard from a number of constituents, and she opposed adding the gas station because the shopping center wasn't designed to accomodate one.

Evans said he still had concerns about the gas station's environmental impact and access to the center. He'd also hoped that Kroger could place it away from the nearby Bravo restaurant, which has outdoor seating. Indianapolis attorney Mike Quinn, who represents Kroger on real estate matters, said changes to the plan were impossible because the three other co-tenants of the plaza, who have to sign off on site plans, would not agree. 

Quinn said the store, last upgraded in 2005, is in line for $3 million in improvements, $1 million of which will be in the fuel center.

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  • that store needs help!
    I live not too far from this Kroger and I can tell you first hand what a dump it is. I'm not sure what $2M will buy, but I would think a total head to toe rehab is in order--new flooring, lighting, aisle layout, etc. The Wal Mart 5 mins away in College Park, while not in the best location, is much nicer after its rehab. This store reminds me of the former Kroger at 96th/Meridian in its last days before Kroger let it go belly up. With its HQ only 90 miles away in Cincy, corporate should realize that this store has potential, but people in the area are more likely to swallow higher prices and shop at places like Marsh at 106th simply because the shopping experience is better.
  • Not a convenience store
    I live in a nearby, very stable, middle-class suburban neighborhood, but I am apparently part of the "low class clientelle" of the Township Line store. The Kroger fuel centers are not manned. The Nora fuel center has no (robbable)attendant on site -- no cash transactions; no lotto; nocigarettes. Kroger knows how to be successful, but it seems to draw out the NIMBY crowd where ever it builds....
  • Safety first
    Keep in mind that this proposed gas station is right down the street from a Village Pantry where a kid shot the clerk. Just what the neighborhood needs -- another magnet for trigger-happy gang bangers in front of an admittedly failing grocery store that is already attracts a lower-class clientele.

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  1. I am not by any means judging whether this is a good or bad project. It's pretty simple, the developers are not showing a hardship or need for this economic incentive. It is a vacant field, the easiest for development, and the developer already has the money to invest $26 million for construction. If they can afford that, they can afford to pay property taxes just like the rest of the residents do. As well, an average of $15/hour is an absolute joke in terms of economic development. Get in high paying jobs and maybe there's a different story. But that's the problem with this ask, it is speculative and users are just not known.

  2. Shouldn't this be a museum

  3. I don't have a problem with higher taxes, since it is obvious that our city is not adequately funded. And Ballard doesn't want to admit it, but he has increased taxes indirectly by 1) selling assets and spending the money, 2) letting now private entities increase user fees which were previously capped, 3) by spending reserves, and 4) by heavy dependence on TIFs. At the end, these are all indirect tax increases since someone will eventually have to pay for them. It's mathematics. You put property tax caps ("tax cut"), but you don't cut expenditures (justifiably so), so you increase taxes indirectly.

  4. Marijuana is the safest natural drug grown. Addiction is never physical. Marijuana health benefits are far more reaching then synthesized drugs. Abbott, Lilly, and the thousands of others create poisons and label them as medication. There is no current manufactured drug on the market that does not pose immediate and long term threat to the human anatomy. Certainly the potency of marijuana has increased by hybrids and growing techniques. However, Alcohol has been proven to destroy more families, relationships, cause more deaths and injuries in addition to the damage done to the body. Many confrontations such as domestic violence and other crimes can be attributed to alcohol. The criminal activities and injustices that surround marijuana exists because it is illegal in much of the world. If legalized throughout the world you would see a dramatic decrease in such activities and a savings to many countries for legal prosecutions, incarceration etc in regards to marijuana. It indeed can create wealth for the government by collecting taxes, creating jobs, etc.... I personally do not partake. I do hope it is legalized throughout the world.

  5. Build the resevoir. If built this will provide jobs and a reason to visit Anderson. The city needs to do something to differentiate itself from other cities in the area. Kudos to people with vision that are backing this project.

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