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Legislation would allow ads on public school buses

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Big yellow school buses could become rolling billboards in a bill approved by the Indiana Senate.

The bill would allow advertising on school buses in two Indianapolis neighborhoods and a school district just north of the city to help combat burdensome transportation costs.

The ads would give cash-strapped school districts a way to raise revenue without increasing taxes.

The bill passed the Senate 49-0 as part of an amendment to another bill, the Indianapolis Star reported. It now goes to the House.

One of the districts affected would be Indianapolis' Franklin Township schools, a district that drew the ire of parents when it started charging for bus rides. The plan was later dropped.

The pilot plan would also allow school bus ads in Beech Grove and Zionsville.

The legislation prohibits political advertising, inappropriate images or the marketing of harmful or offensive products such as tobacco or alcohol.

Colorado became the first school to allow school bus advertising in 1993, the Kokomo Tribune reported. Since then, 10 other states have followed.





 

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  • Brilliant!
    Great idea! There are advertisements all over sporting event programs, etc.. Kids sell brand name products for school. Why not? Guess what, I use the businesses who advertise in our church program, school directory and athletic field/gym signage. What you should worry about is what's in the textbooks that you spend $$$ to purchase.
  • I am supportive of this.
    Taxes on my home in Franklin Township dropped from $3900 a year to $1371 per year after the tax caps. I personally am very supportive of anything that keeps it low, even something as gaudy and ridiculous as vinyl wraps on school busses. Whatever man. These houses are a bargain now. But, if I had kids, I'd consider moving to another area of town where the school system was on a more solid footing...
  • Bad Idea! Goofball Legislature Acts Again
    I agree wholeheartedly with Ugh! Why would thinking adults allow this to happen? Is there no Senator in the Indiana legislature that is able to think through the implications of these types of policies? I bet their was a business lobbyist behind this proposal.
  • Ugh
    Bad idea. Keep education and commercialism separate. We want thinking and creative young adults to come out of our public schools, not "consumers". At most, use ad space for intelligent PSA-type messages and let companies sponsor them with their name/logo in a corner.

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  1. I could be wrong, but I don't think Butler views the new dorm as mere replacements for Schwitzer and or Ross.

  2. An increase of only 5% is awesome compared to what most consumers face or used to face before passage of the ACA. Imagine if the Medicaid program had been expanded to the 400k Hoosiers that would be eligible, the savings would have been substantial to the state and other policy holders. The GOP predictions of plan death spirals, astronomical premium hikes and shortages of care are all bunk. Hopefully voters are paying attention. The Affordable Care Act (a.k.a Obamacare), where fully implemented, has dramatically reduced the number of uninsured and helped contained the growth in healthcare costs.

  3. So much for competition lowering costs.

  4. As I understand the proposal, Keystone would take on the debt, not the city/CRC. So the $104K would not be used to service the $3.8M bond. Keystone would do that with its share.

  5. Adam C, if anything in Carmel is "packed in like sardines", you'll have to show me where you shop for groceries. Based on 2014 population estimates, Carmel has around 85,000 people spread across about 48 square miles, which puts its density at well below 1800 persons/sq mi, which is well below Indianapolis (already a very low-density city). Noblesville is minimally less dense than Carmel as well. The initiatives over the last few years have taken what was previously a provincial crossroads with no real identity beyond lack of poverty (and the predictably above-average school system) and turned it into a place with a discernible look, feel, and a center. Seriously, if you think Carmel is crowded, couldn't you opt to live in the remaining 95% of Indiana that still has an ultra-low density development pattern? Moreover, if you see Carmel as "over-saturated" have you ever been to Chicago--or just about any city outside of Indiana?

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