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Obamacare rebates total $22.6M in Indiana

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Indiana consumers are set to receive rebates that are 59 percent larger this year as Obamacare continues to force health insurers to refund premiums that exceed actual medical claims by more than 20 percent.

That’s opposite the trend nationally, where insurers successfully lowered their rebates by reducing or slowing the rise in premiums.

Rebates in Indiana will average $157 per family, based on premiums charged by insurers in 2012.

Those rebates reflect the $22.6 million that insurers charged above thresholds established by the 2010 Patient Protection & Affordable Care Act. The law, better known as Obamacare, required that insurers spend on medical care no less than 80 percent of the premiums they charge to individuals and small businesses. The requirement is 85 percent for large employer customers.

Nationally, insurer rebates totaled $504 million, or an average of $98 per family, according to data released last week by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

The Obama administration also claimed that the rule, known as a cap on medical-loss ratios, also led insurers to not enact $3.4 billion in premium hikes last year.

“This new standard is increasing transparency and accountability, promoting better business practices and competition among insurance companies, and ensuring consumers receive value for their premium dollars,” said Kathleen Sebelius, secretary of the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, in a prepared statement.

It’s not clear why rebates spiked in Indiana. One challenge for insurers may have been the fact that medical spending is rising more slowly than it has in decades, even dipping in April for the first time since 1975.

A year ago, rebates in Indiana averaged $99 per family, whereas the national average was $151 per family.

Most of the rebates will flow to the small employers that sponsor health insurance for their workers. In the small group market, rebates will be paid on policies that cover 261,300 Hoosiers. The average rebate per family among small employers was $151.

It is up to employers how they pass on those savings to their workers.

Far fewer large employers saw a rebate. Large employer health plans that cover just 3,200 will receive a rebate. However, the rebate per family is large, averaging $638.

Last, 8,662 Hoosiers who are part of a health insurance plan purchased directly from an insurer—without any help from an employer—will also receive a rebate. Those refunds will average $147 per family.

Insurers can pay rebates in four ways: a rebate check in the mail, a reimbursement to the account used to buy insurance, a reduction in next year’s premium, or a refund to employers. All rebates are scheduled to be paid on Aug. 1.

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  • ACA is working
    As noted in some other articles, ACA is also a driver of overall reduction in healthcare cost (i.e. forcing hospitals and insurers to reduce cost). Insuring everyone and bending the cost curve were the main reasons for the ACA. I knew it would work in the long-term, but I am glad to see some good results early on.
  • ACA is working?
    While I've read a lot of criticism and opinions about how costs of healthcare will skyrocket with ACA - mostly political rhetoric and baseless comments filled with conjecture and speculation - it seems that the facts like the premium costs published in California and these rebates intended to restrict cost management and profits to 20%, do not seem to be holding up those "sky is falling" theories. From a business perspective, ACA has always made sense. If more of my friends, family and fellow citizens can afford healthcare insurance, taxpayers will pay for fewer of those non-emergency emergency room runs. While it may not be a right, it should be an American privilege to just go to the doctor once in a while. Adding the uninsured population will lower cost through preventative care, and more drugs and services mean growth for medicine. Hope it all pans out that way.
  • Watch out
    The implosion of the world is going to happen any time now...right, guys???

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  1. If what you stated is true, then this article is entirely inaccurate. "State sells bonds" is same as "State borrows money". Supposedly the company will "pay for them". But since we are paying the company, we are still paying for this road with borrowed money, even though the state has $2 billion in the bank.

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