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Verizon Wireless Center getting new name

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Outdoor amphitheater Verizon Wireless Center in Noblesville will be renamed Klipsch Music Center under a new sponsorship agreement between speaker manufacturer Klipsch Group Inc. and venue owner Live Nation Entertainment.

Terms of the 5-year agreement, effective Thursday, were not disclosed. Company officials are scheduled to make an official announcement about the sponsorship Thursday morning at the amphitheater.

The 24,000-capacity concert venue, which opened in 1989 as Deer Creek Music Center, became Verizon Wireless Center in 2001 under a sponsorship agreement that expired this year.

“Today marks one of the most significant milestones in Klipsch history,” said Klipsch CEO Paul Jacobs in a prepared statement. “For 65 years, Klipsch has delivered on founder Paul W. Klipsch’s groundbreaking acoustic principle of recreating the live music experience. Live shows and their memorable, emotional impact have defined us as a company..."

Klipsch, based in Indianapolis since 1989, was acquired earlier this year by New York-based Audiovox Corp. for $166 million. It operates in Indianapolis as a stand-alone operation with 130 local employees. Earlier this year, Klipsch signed naming-rights agreements with Live Nation for the 7,500-seat Klipsch Amphitheater in Miami and the 1,100-capacity Irving Plaza Powered by Klipsch in New York City.

“The Klipsch brand is a great fit for this sponsorship, enabling them to reach, engage and connect with live music fans and their customers at our venues,” Maureen Ford, venue network president at Live Nation, said in a prepared statement.

The Noblesville venue has seating for about 6,000 in its pavilion area and room for about 18,000 in the lawn area. An average of more than 500,000 people attend events each year at the 228-acre facility, according to Live Nation.

The center is one of eight amphitheaters that Beverly Hills, Calif.-based Live Nation owns outright. Others are leased or operated under a booking contract.

The ticketing and promotions giant inherited the venue through a series of mergers. Local concert promoters Dave Lucas and Steve Sybesma opened Deer Creek in 1989 and later sold their company, Sunshine Promotions, to SFX Entertainment. Clear Channel Communications acquired SFX and in 2005 spun off Live Nation.

The venue was developed for about $12 million. Indiana gospel singer Sandi Patti was the headliner when it opened on May 20, 1989.


 

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  • original name
    It may have been Indiana Fieldhouse at conception, but Conseco signed on before it was built, didn't they? So the building was never really built as Indiana Fieldhouse.
  • Conseco Fieldhouse orginal name
    A lot of people forget that Conseco Fieldhouse was originally called Indiana Fieldhouse before the Conseco deal. It wasn't Indianapolis Fieldhouse as pointed out above but it definitely was Indiana Fieldhouse before they made the Conseco deal. If I remember correctly, the Conseco deals run out relatively soon (next 8 or 9 years roughly) so it will almost certainly be something other than Conseco Fieldhouse before too long. Conseco doesn't have the money to retain the naming rights once the current deal runs out.
  • Fieldhouse
    It has never been Indianapolis Fieldhouse
  • Deercreek
    IT will always be deercreek to me. Especially if these places continue to play musical names. IRP, Indianapolis Fieldhouse, Hoosier dome and well i guess its always been lucas oil stadium.

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  1. You are correct that Obamacare requires health insurance policies to include richer benefits and protects patients who get sick. That's what I was getting at when I wrote above, "That’s because Obamacare required insurers to take all customers, regardless of their health status, and also established a floor on how skimpy the benefits paid for by health plans could be." I think it's vital to know exactly how much the essential health benefits are costing over previous policies. Unless we know the cost of the law, we can't do a cost-benefit analysis. Taxes were raised in order to offset a 31% rise in health insurance premiums, an increase that paid for richer benefits. Are those richer benefits worth that much or not? That's the question we need to answer. This study at least gets us started on doing so.

  2. *5 employees per floor. Either way its ridiculous.

  3. Jim, thanks for always ready my stuff and providing thoughtful comments. I am sure that someone more familiar with research design and methods could take issue with Kowalski's study. I thought it was of considerable value, however, because so far we have been crediting Obamacare for all the gains in coverage and all price increases, neither of which is entirely fair. This is at least a rigorous attempt to sort things out. Maybe a quixotic attempt, but it's one of the first ones I've seen try to do it in a sophisticated way.

  4. In addition to rewriting history, the paper (or at least your summary of it) ignores that Obamacare policies now must provide "essential health benefits". Maybe Mr Wall has always been insured in a group plan but even group plans had holes you could drive a truck through, like the Colts defensive line last night. Individual plans were even worse. So, when you come up with a study that factors that in, let me know, otherwise the numbers are garbage.

  5. You guys are absolutely right: Cummins should build a massive 80-story high rise, and give each employee 5 floors. Or, I suppose they could always rent out the top floors if they wanted, since downtown office space is bursting at the seams (http://www.ibj.com/article?articleId=49481).

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