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Distribution plan keeps provisions plentiful despite crowds

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Downtown's Super Bowl revelry still is going strong thanks in large part to a distribution strategy that includes extra routes, earlier deliveries and an ample supply of food and booze to replenish local establishments.

Indianapolis-based Monarch Beverage projected it would need an additional 50,000 cases of beer above normal demand for downtown based on prior Super Bowls. But the company ordered 150,000, just to be safe.

No one wants a repeat of the Crossroads Classic college basketball doubleheader weekend, when beer taps dried up at several downtown watering holes.

"We will not run out of beer," Monarch spokeswoman Amanda Uhles wrote in an e-mail.

The beer-and-wine distributor also added a third shift to its delivery rotation, giving bars an additional restocking option between 2 a.m. and 8 a.m. Drivers have the added challenge of transporting their special deliveries several blocks in some cases based on road closures, but they have risen to the occasion.

"So far we are very happy with the business the Super Bowl has brought to our company as well as Indianapolis," Uhles said. "Indy is pulling out all the stops with this event."

Piazza Produce Inc. also is running extra and earlier Super Bowl routes to keep up with demand that's about 25 percent greater than usual, said Marcus Agresta, the local company's general manager. (IBJ rides along on a 3 a.m. delivery in the video below.)

Employees met with customers early on to ensure it would have enough produce on hand including lemons and limes, which are in particularly high demand, Agresta said.

They're also able to fill special rush orders: St. Elmo Steak House decided this week to serve a special warm apple cider cocktail with spiced rum, cinnamon and whipped cream from a tent next door to the restaurant. It was such a hit that supplies ran dangerously low. Piazza had a cider-loaded truck on the way within an hour.

The city's decision to tighten up the hours when deliveries are allowed downtown, generally between midnight and 9 a.m., helped work out some of the kinks before big crowds descended on downtown.

"It's been surprisingly smooth," Agresta said.

Plenty of food and drink is good news for Paul Murzyn, an owner of Kilroy's at Georgia and Meridian streets.

Revenue for the week is 10 percent ahead of the business' most optimistic expectations, thanks in part to the huge crowds that have turned out for the nearby Super Bowl Village and NFL Experience.

"Business is great," he said. "We're getting everything we need."

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  • shut out
    This super bowl planning has shut out local businesses that were expecting a bump in business. Instead of spreading the festivities around town what we got was hordes of people in one place and a lot of vacant buildings turned into businesses for one week taking away customers who might have spent money in year round businesses. Thanks for all the hype leading up to this event but you wont get my support next time around unless some changes are made to include the local establishments. Now get out there giants and do to the patriots what the city did to us . Shut them out.

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  1. to mention the rest of Molly's experience- she served as Communications Director for the Indianapolis Department of Public Works and also did communications for the state. She's incredibly qualified for this role and has a real love for Indianapolis and Indiana. Best of luck to her!

  2. Shall we not demand the same scrutiny for law schools, med schools, heaven forbid, business schools, etc.? How many law school grads are servers? How many business start ups fail and how many business grads get low paying jobs because there are so few high paying positions available? Why does our legislature continue to demean public schools and give taxpayer dollars to charters and private schools, ($171 million last year), rather than investing in our community schools? We are on a course of disaster regarding our public school attitudes unless we change our thinking in a short time.

  3. I agree with the other reader's comment about the chunky tomato soup. I found myself wanting a breadstick to dip into it. It tasted more like a marinara sauce; I couldn't eat it as a soup. In general, I liked the place... but doubt that I'll frequent it once the novelty wears off.

  4. The Indiana toll road used to have some of the cleanest bathrooms you could find on the road. After the lease they went downhill quickly. While not the grossest you'll see, they hover a bit below average. Am not sure if this is indicative of the entire deal or merely a portion of it. But the goals of anyone taking over the lease will always be at odds. The fewer repairs they make, the more money they earn since they have a virtual monopoly on travel from Cleveland to Chicago. So they only comply to satisfy the rules. It's hard to hand public works over to private enterprise. The incentives are misaligned. In true competition, you'd have multiple roads, each build by different companies motivated to make theirs more attractive. Working to attract customers is very different than working to maximize profit on people who have no choice but to choose your road. Of course, we all know two roads would be even more ridiculous.

  5. The State is in a perfect position. The consortium overpaid for leasing the toll road. Good for the State. The money they paid is being used across the State to upgrade roads and bridges and employ people at at time most of the country is scrambling to fund basic repairs. Good for the State. Indiana taxpayers are no longer subsidizing the toll roads to the tune of millions a year as we had for the last 20 years because the legislature did not have the guts to raise tolls. Good for the State. If the consortium fails, they either find another operator, acceptable to the State, to buy them out or the road gets turned back over to the State and we keep the Billions. Good for the State. Pat Bauer is no longer the Majority or Minority Leader of the House. Good for the State. Anyway you look at this, the State received billions of dollars for an assett the taxpayers were subsidizing, the State does not have to pay to maintain the road for 70 years. I am having trouble seeing the downside.

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