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People in the news - Feb. 22, 2010

IBJ Staff
February 20, 2010
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People listings are free. Information must be submitted at least 11 days before the Monday issue in which it is to appear. Publication of information might be delayed due to space limitations. To submit information and photos online go to www.ibj.com and use the People submissions form. Photos may be sent as jpegs, 300 dpi and face 3 inches wide. For more information, contact bmaurer@ibj.com.

Health Care
Carla L.C. Baxter has joined CareGivers Inc. as director, promotions and community relations. Ceil Upchurch has joined as a low vision specialist.

 Dr. Clark Perry has joined Diabetes, Internal Medicine and Endocrinology, a Community Physicians of Indiana office.

Law
Kristen M. Carroll and Jennifer M. Herrmann have been named partners at Kightlinger & Gray LLP.

Kevin Thompson has been named business manager of Plews Shadley Racher & Braun LLP. Debbie Fennessy has been named human resources manager.

Printing/Publishing
Jill Wangler has joined Fineline Printing Group as director of marketing and Laurie Heck has joined as account manager.

Professional/Trade
The Design Build Institute of America, Great Lakes Region, has named the following officers: Pat Miller, Baker & Daniels, president; Wes Nicholson, CPM Construction, vice president; John Voigt, Brownsburg Community Schools, treasurer; Pam McNealy, Hunt Construction Group, secretary; and Lewie Wallace, Purdue University, past president.

Indiana Economic Development Association has named the following officers: Darrell Voelker, Harrison County Economic Development Corp., president; William Dory, Greencastle-Putnam County Development Ctr., vice president; Susan Borries Reed, IMPA, secretary; Julie Ashmore, treasurer; Michael Heaton, Duke Energy, past president. New directors are Kathy Ertel, Jennings County Economic Development Commission; Vicki Kellerman, Economic Development Corp. of Greensburg/Decatur Co.; Nolan ‘Skip’ Kuker, Logansport-Cass County ED Foundation; Cheryl Morphew, Johnson County Development Corp.; Corey Murphy, Economic Development Partners of Jefferson County Indiana; Connie Neininger, White County Economic Development; Diane Thalmann, NIPSCO; Jim Tidd, Miami County Economic Development Authority; and Alan Tio, Whitley County EDC.

The Social Health Association of Indiana Inc. has named the following officers: Natalie Dean, Ice Miller LLP, president; Elliott Pinkie, Hoover Hull LLP, first vice president; Mary Lett, M M Lett Associates, second vice president; Darren Bridge, First Merchants, treasurer; and Stephanie Dominguez, secretary. New directors are Marla Lenz, Purdue University; Cindy Mitchell, Clarian Health; Audrey Satterblom, Indianapolis Public Schools; John Slatten, Slatten & Co.; Mitch Still, Key Bank; and Penny Wright, RN.

Services
Sam Calderon has been named president of health care and hospitality sales for the Americas at Office360.

Pamela S. Hrubey, Eli Lilly and Co., has been named chairwoman of the board of the Better Business Bureau of Central Indiana.

John Nadelin has joined Safis Solutions as a senior compliance advisor.

Sports
Lee W. Johnson has joined USA Gymnastics as the senior director of marketing.

Mark Apple has joined the Indianapolis Motor Speedway sales department as a business development account executive.•

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  1. How much you wanna bet, that 70% of the jobs created there (after construction) are minimum wage? And Harvey is correct, the vast majority of residents in this project will drive to their jobs, and to think otherwise, is like Harvey says, a pipe dream. Someone working at a restaurant or retail store will not be able to afford living there. What ever happened to people who wanted to build buildings, paying for it themselves? Not a fan of these tax deals.

  2. Uh, no GeorgeP. The project is supposed to bring on 1,000 jobs and those people along with the people that will be living in the new residential will be driving to their jobs. The walkable stuff is a pipe dream. Besides, walkable is defined as having all daily necessities within 1/2 mile. That's not the case here. Never will be.

  3. Brad is on to something there. The merger of the Formula E and IndyCar Series would give IndyCar access to International markets and Formula E access the Indianapolis 500, not to mention some other events in the USA. Maybe after 2016 but before the new Dallara is rolled out for 2018. This give IndyCar two more seasons to run the DW12 and Formula E to get charged up, pun intended. Then shock the racing world, pun intended, but making the 101st Indianapolis 500 a stellar, groundbreaking event: The first all-electric Indy 500, and use that platform to promote the future of the sport.

  4. No, HarveyF, the exact opposite. Greater density and closeness to retail and everyday necessities reduces traffic. When one has to drive miles for necessities, all those cars are on the roads for many miles. When reasonable density is built, low rise in this case, in the middle of a thriving retail area, one has to drive far less, actually reducing the number of cars on the road.

  5. The Indy Star announced today the appointment of a new Beverage Reporter! So instead of insightful reports on Indy pro sports and Indiana college teams, you now get to read stories about the 432nd new brewery open or some obscure Hoosier winery winning a county fair blue ribbon. Yep, that's the coverage we Star readers crave. Not.

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