IBJNews

Cummins needs to hire 7,000 engineers, CEO says

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

Cummins Inc. needs to add 7,000 engineers within five years, CEO Theodore Solso said Wednesday at a Bloomberg Innovation and Jobs Forum in Washington, D.C.

The Columbus-based maker of diesel and natural gas engines and electric power-generation systems is forecasting a sharp rise in annual sales. Additional reductions in engine pollution and more stringent fuel efficiency rules will dominate engine technology and development for the next 10 years, requiring more engineering resources.

Those engineers will be hired in India, China and Africa as well as in the United States, United Kingdom and Brazil.

In the U.S. light vehicle market, Cummins is a supplier of diesel engines for the Chrysler Group.

The company told analysts last month that its annual sales are forecast to grow by more than 60 percent and reach $30 billion in 2015.

Cummins expects revenue growth to average 14 percent a year from 2011 to 2015.

Overseas demand and tougher environmental standards for engine emissions are pushing Cummins' revenues higher, overcoming weak economic growth in several global markets.

"Several of the economies where Cummins operates are clearly weakening," COO Tom Linebarger told analysts last month. "We really don't know how deep it will go. We are confident in the long-term profitable growth of the company."

Company officials said tighter standards for engine exhaust have allowed Cummins to leverage its engineering expertise, particularly in emerging markets where some domestic rivals lack the technical skill to comply with the tougher rules.

The expansion of infrastructure in emerging economies such as South America, China and India is driving demand for Cummins's engines used in construction equipment, commercial trucks, and power generators.

The company's engine shipments are also being helped by expanded output of oil, natural gas and mined commodities, executives told analysts.

ADVERTISEMENT

  • 7,000 Engineers
    Hey CMI - how about rehiring some of the 1,200 engineers you laid-off in 2009? How about rehiring some of the people who were already trained, qualified, and willing to come work for you? Oh wait - you can't? Why not? OH...that's right, you have a policy in place that says if you take a severance, you can't get rehired..>EVER<...good strategy.
  • It's not the taxes
    It's not the taxes, it's our standard of living. The reason we don't live like people in India or China is because we aren't paid like people in India or China. And quite frankly, we don't want to.
  • Cummins
    Now if only congress would revisit the tax structure for corps you'd see companies like CMI do more in the US. Clearly it is more profitable to have ops overseas to the detriment of the US tax base.

    Post a comment to this story

    COMMENTS POLICY
    We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
     
    You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
     
    Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in IBJ editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
     
    No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
     
    We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
     

    Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

    Sponsored by
    ADVERTISEMENT

    facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

    Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
    Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
     
    Subscribe to IBJ
    1. How can any company that has the cash and other assets be allowed to simply foreclose and not pay the debt? Simon, pay the debt and sell the property yourself. Don't just stiff the bank with the loan and require them to find a buyer.

    2. If you only knew....

    3. The proposal is structured in such a way that a private company (who has competitors in the marketplace) has struck a deal to get "financing" through utility ratepayers via IPL. Competitors to BlueIndy are at disadvantage now. The story isn't "how green can we be" but how creative "financing" through captive ratepayers benefits a company whose proposal should sink or float in the competitive marketplace without customer funding. If it was a great idea there would be financing available. IBJ needs to be doing a story on the utility ratemaking piece of this (which is pretty complicated) but instead it suggests that folks are whining about paying for being green.

    4. The facts contained in your post make your position so much more credible than those based on sheer emotion. Thanks for enlightening us.

    5. Please consider a couple of economic realities: First, retail is more consolidated now than it was when malls like this were built. There used to be many department stores. Now, in essence, there is one--Macy's. Right off, you've eliminated the need for multiple anchor stores in malls. And in-line retailers have consolidated or folded or have stopped building new stores because so much of their business is now online. The Limited, for example, Next, malls are closing all over the country, even some of the former gems are now derelict.Times change. And finally, as the income level of any particular area declines, so do the retail offerings. Sad, but true.

    ADVERTISEMENT