IBJNews

Nancy Irsay puts party pavilion, home on market for $3.7M

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

The Robert Irsay Pavilion at 116h Street and Ditch Road in Carmel has hosted its last event.

Nancy Irsay, the widow of the former Indianapolis Colts owner, has put the 10,000-square-foot facility and her adjacent home on the market for $3.7 million.

REW Nancy Irsay pavilion 15colIrsay used the pavilion on her property to help local charities host events. (IBJ Photo/Scott Olson)

Irsay’s decision to sell the pavilion is a blow to dozens of local charities that have hosted fundraisers there, usually at a fraction of what they would pay to rent similar facilities.

A Boys and Girls Club of Indianapolis event May 2 was the final event at the pavilion under Irsay’s ownership.

“The way Nancy ran the facility, it was just a very cost-effective location to hold a fundraiser,” said Rick Whitten, executive director of the local Boys and Girls Club. “Having priced lots of places, I would guess she was underwriting a lot of the costs to operate the facility.”

Indeed, Irsay typically would charge a flat $1,000 even though expenses might run $3,000 to $5,000 per event. But her generosity can only extend so far. She said she can no longer afford to absorb the additional costs.

“Even a thousand dollars is a lot of money" for charities, she said. “But you get into a habit of doing things.”

Irsay is listing the nearly 40-acre property, including the pavilion and her 8,600-square-foot home, with Bif Ward of F.C. Tucker Co. Inc, the Indianapolis area’s top real estate agent in terms of sales.

In 2011, the most recent year for which IBJ statistics are available, Ward’s largest transaction was nearly $2.9 million. Irsay’s property would dwarf that, if it fetches near the asking price.

Ward's listing says the property's planned sale provides a “once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to own one of the most sought-after estates in Hamilton County.”

The pavilion held its first event in 1986, for Christamore House and Little Sisters of the Poor, in conjunction with Robert Irsay Charities and the Indianapolis Colts.

The Irsays expanded the facility in 1992 to include a full stage, sound booth, floating dance floor, changing rooms and a capacity to seat 430 for dinner.

Celebrities such as Tony Bennett, Kelsey Grammer and John Mellencamp attended events there. But Nancy Irsay mostly catered to small charities that couldn’t afford to host events at pricier venues.

She might book up to 20 events a year. That might not seem like a lot, but she only made the venue available six months out of the year—March to May and September to November.

The pavilion is constructed to be disassembled and moved, if necessary, which could prompt Irsay to sell the steel structure separate from her home.

The 15-room spread was built in 1978 and costs her more than $43,000 in annual property taxes, according to the listing information.

Irsay wants to downsize and spend more time in California, where a good friend resides. Irsay also lives part of the year in England, where her father was born.

Still, she has no plans to disappear entirely from the Indianapolis area.

“I’m very comfortable here,” she said. “I’ve lived here too long.”
 

ADVERTISEMENT

  • Kudos To Nancy
    Nancy deserves a tremendous amount of credit for her benevolence and kindness. I have attended many fund raising events there and always was grateful she was such a supporter of the community...as was Robert. This oommunity will miss her support.
  • na
    I would like to say, it is very important to have several appraisers on the Irsay property. This is an icon and will be used for future reference for other properties. We do not want another mortgage bubble.

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in IBJ editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. The Walgreens did not get a lot of traffic. It was not located on the corner of the intersection, and not really visible from Emerson. Meanwhile the CVS there is huge and right on the corner. I am guessing a lot of people drove by a million times and never knew the Walgreens was there. Although, with the new Walmart market going in, that area could really see a lot of increase in traffic soon.

  2. You folks don't have a clue. There is a legal way to enter this country and to get aid. This left unchecked could run us to ruin quickly. I also heard that 'supporters' were getting major $$ to take them in? Who's monitoring this and guess who pays the bill? I support charitable organizations... but this is NOT the way to do it!

  3. Apparently at some time before alcohol has been served at the fair. The problem is that beer or wine used to be a common drink for people before soft drinks and was not thought to be that unusual. Since many folks now only drink to see how much they can drink or what kind of condition they can end up in it becomes more problematic. Go to Europe and its no big deal just as if you had sodas of milk to drink everyday. Its using common sense that is lacking now days.

  4. To address the epic failure of attracting race fans to both the Indy 500 and Brickyard 400 would take too much of my time to write. Bottom line Boles is clueless and obviously totally out of touch with the real paying fan base. I see nothing but death spin coming for the Brickyard, just like Indy. Get somebody in a place of power that understands what race fans want.

  5. I am a race fan through & through. It doesn't matter if it's Indy cars or Nascar. I love a great race. I go to several other tracks each year and you can see the entire track. I know Indy has tradition, but fans want to see the entire race. I sit in the Penthouse, am almost 60 years old, and would like to see a better TV screen in turn 1 so you can see the entire race. Then I think Indy needs to install an escalator so us old folks can make it up to the Penthouse and down again if we want more options to purchase food and drinks. Just a race fans opinion. Lights won't make the race any better, but you might be able to see the TV better at night. Turn 1's screen needs replaced with a better and bigger screen.

ADVERTISEMENT