IBJNews

Indiana tourism effort honors famed course designer Dye

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

Indiana tourism leaders have recruited legendary golf course architect Pete Dye to help promote a new effort that will showcase some of his best designs and draw more visitors to the state.

Dye joined Gov. Mitch Daniels and other officials Thursday morning at Brickyard Crossing in Indianapolis to launch the Pete Dye Golf Trail, a collection of seven public courses he selected for the campaign.

Besides Brickyard Crossing, other courses on the trail are The Fort Golf Resort and Maple Creek Golf & Country Club in Indianapolis; Plum Creek Golf Club in Carmel; Mystic Hills Golf Club in Culver; Kampen Course in Lafayette; and The Pete Dye Course at French Lick.

Tourism officials are marketing the trail as an opportunity to give both Hoosiers and visitors an opportunity to play Dye-designed courses at a reduced rate. Players who complete the trail within a calendar year will be rewarded with a commemorative gift.

Jeff Williams, Brickyard Crossing’s director of golf, said he's honored that Dye chose the course to be part of the trail.

“Indiana has the best collection of Pete Dye courses in the country, and he happens to live here,” Williams said. “We are so proud to be a part of the deal.”

Dye, 85, has designed about 90 courses, including more than 20 in Indiana, the most of any state. He said he's proud of all his creations, but one in particular on the trail—his course at French Lick—draws his highest praise. It opened in 2007.

“That was the ultimate golf course I ever built,” Dye told IBJ. “It’s on the highest point in southern Indiana. It’s unbelievable. You can see for miles down there.”

The Indianapolis Convention & Visitors Association has begun promoting the trail with a 30-second television advertisement airing on the Golf Channel in the Chicago and Louisville markets.

“He is revered worldwide as the father of golf course architecture,” the segment says. “This is your invitation to travel his home state in Indiana and play a collection of courses that could only come from the mind of Pete Dye.”

The ICVA, in partnership with the Indiana Office of Tourism Development and convention bureaus near the courses, plans to seek state funding to place signage along the interstates.

Signs in Alabama promoting its Robert Trent Jones Trail caught the eye last year of Daniels, who suggested the ICVA help launch a similar attraction in Indiana.

The Alabama trail, which features 26 courses from designer Jones, consistently has ranked as one of the state’s top tourist destinations since opening in 1992.

ICVA spokesman Chris Gahl recalled a conversation with the governor in which he asked if the association could create a similar trail to honor Dye. ICVA spent the past year with officials from the courses Dye selected to coordinate the project.

“If you look at Michigan and Florida and what they’ve done with golf tourism, Indiana had an opportunity because Pete and Alice Dye are residents,” Gahl said.

Dye, who moved to Indianapolis from Ohio in 1950 after marrying Alice, has been an ambassador for the game for more than 50 years.

He worked on a golf course as a youngster and became greens keeper at the Fort Bragg base course in North Carolina while serving in the Army following World War II.

No slouch with the clubs either, Dye won the Indiana State Amateur Championship in 1958 and finished second twice.

But it’s his designs that catapulted him into golfing fame. He built his first course, the Eldorado in Greenwood (now called Dye’s Walk Country Club), in 1960.

The then-president of the University of Michigan, Harlan Hatcher, played the course on a trip to Indiana, Dye recalled. Impressed with the layout, Hatcher commissioned Dye to design a course for the university.

“I’ve been building ever since,” Dye said. “Isn’t that something?”

More information on the trail is available here.

 

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in IBJ editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. I think the poster was being sarcastic and only posting or making fun of what is usually posted on here about anything being built in BR or d'town for that matter.

  2. Great news IRL fans: TURBO the IMS sanctioned movie about slugs running the Indy 500 has caught the Securities and Exchange Commission because Dreamworks had to take a $132MILLION write down...because the movie was such a flop. See, the Indy/IMS magic soiled another pair of drawers. Bwahahahahahaha! How's CARTOWN doing? HAHAHAHA...Indy is for losers.

  3. So disappointed in WIBC. This is the last straw to lose a good local morning program. I used to be able to rely on WIBC to give me good local information, news, weather and traffic on my 45 minute commute.Two incidents when I needed local, accurate information regarding severe weather were the first signs I could not now rely on WIBC. I work weekend 12 hour nights for a downtown hospital. This past winter when we had the worst snowfall in my 50 years of life, I came home on a Sunday morning, went to sleep (because I was to go back in Sunday night for another 12 hour shift), and woke up around 1 p.m. to a house with no electricity. I keep an old battery powered radio around and turned on WIBC to see what was going on with the winter storm and the roads and the power outage. Sigh. Only policital stuff. Not even a break in to update on the winter storm warning. The second weather incident occurred when I was driving home during a severe thunderstorm a few months ago. I had already gotten a call from my husband that a tornado warning was just southwest of where I had been. I turned to WIBC to find out what direction the storm was headed so I could figure out a route home, only to find Rush on the air, and again, no breaking away from this stupidity to give me information. Thank God for my phone, which gave me the warning that I was driving in an area where a tornado was seen. Thanks for nothing WIBC. Good luck to you, Steve! We need more of you and not the politics of hatred that WIBC wants to shove at us. Good thing I have Satellite radio.

  4. I read the retail roundup article and tried Burritos and Beers tonight. I'm glad I did, for the food was great. Fresh authentic Mexican food. Great seasoning on the carne asada. A must try!!! Thanks for sharing.

  5. John, unfortunately CTRWD wants to put the tank(s) right next to a nature preserve and at the southern entrance to Carmel off of Keystone. Not exactly the kind of message you want to send to residents and visitors (come see our tanks as you enter our city and we build stuff in nature preserves...

ADVERTISEMENT