Shelby County

Legislature snubs casinos, but forms study committeeRestricted Content

July 6, 2009
Peter Schnitzler
Indiana's struggling gambling industry didn't get the relief it sought during the special session of the Indiana General Assembly. But embedded within the budget bill approved June 30 is a provision creating a gambling summer study committee. Its recommendations, due by Dec. 1, may make or break several of Indiana's casinos.
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Casino-tax controversy lit fire under residents of Fairland, a long-forgotten townRestricted Content

April 20, 2009
Kathleen McLaughlin
With a town government behind them, Fairland-area residents hope any future growth will be to their benefit.
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Our newest smoke-filled workplace: Sadly, it stinksRestricted Content

March 23, 2009
Bruce Hetrick
Hoosiers workers—including those who work at casinos—deserve a healthy, smoke-free workplace.
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Recession forces Shelby County's largest employer to cut workersRestricted Content

December 15, 2008
Knauf Insulation is cutting 11 percent of its work force in Shelbyville as the recession prolongs the housing downturn that began two years ago.
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As workers lose jobs, Shelbyville hospital loses moneyRestricted Content

November 17, 2008
Because major employers in Shelby County have laid off workers, Major Hospital isn't getting as much income from employer-based medical insurance plans.
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Two central Indiana racinos debut amid tough economyRestricted Content

June 2, 2008
Peter Schnitzler
The next few weeks will be critical for the state's two new racinos, which need to open with a splash to meet their ambitious projections of drawing more than 3 million visitors apiece annually. Hoosier Park in Anderson will open June 2, and Indiana Downs in Shelbyville will follow a week later.
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Racinos may push gambling's limitsRestricted Content

May 14, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
During their first half-decade in operation, the state's casino slots machines grew their total sales to $22 billion, according to Indiana Gaming Commission records. But in the last five years, slot sales grew just 18 percent, reaching $25.9 billion in 2006. That's what business textbooks call a maturing market.
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Off to slow start, French Lick fears threat from 'racinos'Restricted Content

February 26, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
French Lick Resorts & Casino is already struggling, less than four months after its launch. And the casino's owners are downright terrified legislators soon will allow both of the state's horse-racing tracks to become "racinos" and add up to 5,000 slot machines.
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  1. Hiking blocks to an office after fighting traffic is not logical. Having office buildings around the loop, 465 and in cities in surrounding counties is logical. In other words, counties around Indianapolis need office buildings like Keystone, Meridian, Michigan Road/College Park and then no need to go downtown. Financial, legal, professional businesses don't need the downtown when Carmel, Fishers, North Indy are building their own central office buildings close to the professionals. The more Hamilton, Boone county attract professionals, the less downtown is relevant. Highrises have no meaning if they don't have adequate parking for professionals and clients. Great for show, but not exactly downtown Chicago, no lakefront, no river to speak of, and no view from highrises of lake Michigan and the magnificent mile. Indianapolis has no view.

  2. "The car count, THE SERIES, THE RACING, THE RATINGS, THE ATTENDANCE< AND THE MANAGEMENT, EVERY season is sub-par." ______________ You're welcome!

  3. that it actually looked a lot like Sato v Franchitti @Houston. And judging from Dario's marble mouthed presentation providing "color", I'd say that he still suffers from his Dallara inflicted head injury._______Considering that the Formula E cars weren't going that quickly at that exact moment, that was impressive air time. But I guess we shouldn't be surprised, as Dallara is the only car builder that needs an FAA certification for their cars. But flying Dallaras aren't new. Just ask Dan Wheldon.

  4. Does anyone know how and where I can get involved and included?

  5. While the data supporting the success of educating our preschoolers is significant, the method of reaching this age group should be multi-faceted. Getting business involved in support of early childhood education is needed. But the ways for businesses to be involved are not just giving money to programs and services. Corporations and businesses educating their own workforce in the importance of sending a child to kindergarten prepared to learn is an alternative way that needs to be addressed. Helping parents prepare their children for school and be involved is a proven method for success. However, many parents are not sure how to help their children. The public is often led to think that preschool education happens only in schools, daycare, or learning centers but parents and other family members along with pediatricians, librarians, museums, etc. are valuable resources in educating our youngsters. When parents are informed through work lunch hour workshops in educating a young child, website exposure to exceptional teaching ideas that illustrate how to encourage learning for fun, media input, and directed community focus on early childhood that is when a difference will be seen. As a society we all need to look outside the normal paths of educating and reaching preschoolers. It is when methods of involving the most important adult in a child's life - a parent, that real success in educating our future workers will occur. The website www.ifnotyouwho.org is free and illustrates activities that are research-based, easy to follow and fun! Businesses should be encouraging their workers to tackle this issue and this website makes it easy for parents to be involved. The focus of preschool education should be to inspire all the adults in a preschooler's life to be aware of what they can do to prepare a child for their future life. Fortunately we now know best practices to prepare a child for a successful start to school. Is the business community ready to be involved in educating preschoolers when it becomes more than a donation but a challenge to their own workers?

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