Eli Lilly and Co.

With pharma famine looming, Lilly relying on snack-size dealsRestricted Content

May 4, 2009
J.K. Wall
Compared with some of his pharmaceutical CEO peers these days, John Lechleiter has his company on a diet. Instead of using a mega-merger to bulk up before the famine that patent expirations will bring on the industry next year, Lechleiter has Eli Lilly and Co. burning management fat while looking for smaller companies to munch on.
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Obama's reforms could bite LillyRestricted Content

April 20, 2009
When it comes to health care reform, Eli Lilly and Co. has its derriere exposed more than its drugmaker peers.
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In spite of criticism, Lilly saves livesRestricted Content

March 30, 2009
Steven J.
My wife, Becky, is alive today because of Lilly and its trial drug Enzastaurin, a great surgeon, and a terrific team of local doctors.
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Executives make many trips to Washington to argue for 14 years of sales exclusivity for new drugs made from cellsRestricted Content

March 23, 2009
J.K. Wall
Eli Lilly & Co. executives are making many trips to Washington to argue for 14 years of sales exclusivity for new drugs made from cells.
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Lilly relying on technology to spot management talentRestricted Content

March 2, 2009
Scott Olson
An electronic succession-planning system created by Eli Lilly & Co. about seven years ago is sniffing out top talent.
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Are we victims of 'group think'?Restricted Content

February 16, 2009
John Guy
"Group think," a powerful and controlling force, was present as the Capital Improvement Board built Lucas Oil Stadium and Eli Lilly and Co. developed and marketed Zyprexa.
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Health care interests wary of state's cost-cutting idea for MedicaidRestricted Content

February 9, 2009
J.K. Wall
Indiana Medicaid officials want to take over management of all its patients' prescription drugs because they say it could save the state as much as $40 million a year.
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Biotech push may help offset generic competition; some analysts skepticalRestricted Content

February 2, 2009
J.K. Wall
Lilly executives want to make biotech their top focus.
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Lilly settles Zyprexa marketing suit for $1.4 billion

January 15, 2009
J.K. Wall
Indianapolis-based Lilly pleaded guilty to one violation of the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act on Thursday and agreed to pay $1.42 billion to settle both that criminal charge as well as civil lawsuits in which it did not admit wrongdoing.
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Lilly eyes generic biotech drugsRestricted Content

January 5, 2009
Generic drugmakers have been the nemesis of companies like Eli Lilly and Co., but now the Indianapolis-based company and its peers want to get in the generic game themselves.
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Lilly makes $6.5B acquisitionRestricted Content

December 29, 2008
J.K. Wall
Eli Lilly and Co. CEO John Lechleiter played a game of pharmaceutical poker with former Lilly Chief Financial Officer Jim Cornelius—and won.
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Generic meds cost more than consumers realizeRestricted Content

December 15, 2008
Generic drug makers drive up the cost of name-brand drugs developed by locally based Eli Lilly and Co. and other pharmaceutical firms.
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Lilly fighting with generic drug firms over Cymbalta, Alimta, 5 other medicationsRestricted Content

December 8, 2008
J.K. Wall
Eli Lilly & Co. has filed lawsuits against seven generic drug companies in federal court in Indianapolis, asking a judge to declare its Cymbalta patent valid and to tell the generic companies to back off.
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Eli Lilly investing $100M in China, hoping to attract research partners

December 1, 2008
Brian Spegele
Hoping to increase sales in China's rapidly growing pharmaceutical market, Eli Lilly and Co. is charging ahead with plans to invest $100 million in venture capital in the region over the next several years.
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Despite sour economy, retail developers press onRestricted Content

December 1, 2008
Greg AndrewsMore

Lilly buys ImClone as part of strategy to capitalize on cancer-drug marketRestricted Content

October 13, 2008
J.K. Wall

Eli Lilly and Co. has written a $6.5 billion IOU to acquire the cancer drugs of ImClone Systems Inc. Cancer drugs are now the best-selling class of drugs in the world and one of the fastest growing.


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Lilly taps hedge fund to cut research costs for Alzheimer's drugsRestricted Content

August 11, 2008
J.K. Wall

Eli Lilly and Co.'s unorthodox efforts to develop new treatments for Alzheimer's disease--if successful--could usher in a new approach to drug development. The Indianapolis-based pharmaceutical company announced that a New York hedge fund, TPG-Axon Capital, will invest up to $325 million to help cover the exorbitant development costs of two experimental compounds to treat Alzheimer's disease.

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Janitors want Lilly, WellPoint to push for better health benefitsRestricted Content

April 14, 2008
J.K. Wall
Service Employees International Union Local 3 is backing local janitors as they restart contract negotiations April 16 with five of the largest janitorial contractors in Indianapolis. SEIU now is taking direct aim at Lilly, health insurer WellPoint Inc. and even some local hospitals, hoping they will pressure the janitorial contractors to come to terms.
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Lilly expects FDA approval of long-acting version of ZyprexaRestricted Content

February 4, 2008
J.K. Wall
Eli Lilly and Co. hopes to extend the life of its best-seller Zyprexa with a potentially lucrative, long-acting form of the antipsychotic drug. But first, the Indianapolis-based drugmaker must win over a panel of medical experts convened by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Feb. 6.
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Taurel passes the batonRestricted Content

December 31, 2007
J.K. Wall
A new leader will guide the city's largest company in 2008, with some of the biggest challenges in its history on the horizon. Eli Lilly and Co. announced Dec. 18 that CEO Sidney Taurel will step down March 31 and will be replaced by President John C. Lechleiter, who has been the heir apparent for more than two years.
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New Lilly CEO called analytical, 'incredibly warm'Restricted Content

December 24, 2007
J.K. Wall
John C. Lechleiter, whom Eli Lilly and Co.'s board voted to replace Sidney Taurel as CEO, is known for getting things done and yet also for being good at analysis and relating to people under him. Taurel will step down at the end of March but remain chairman until the end of 2008.
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Taurel helped Lilly weather Prozac defeat, but he also stumbledRestricted Content

December 24, 2007
J.K. Wall
When Eli Lilly and Co. CEO Sidney Taurel announced his retirement Dec. 18, he said he was leaving the company in good shape. And he can cite plenty of evidence to support him. But when Taurel steps down as CEO March 31, he also will leave a legacy of a languishing stock price and some costly mistakes that some think could have been avoided. "The facts are the facts; I guess you can't ignore it. The stock price has been...
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Lilly's plan to outsource more work is good news, bad newsRestricted Content

December 17, 2007
J.K. Wall
Eli Lilly and Co. will shrink itself with "great intensity" over the next few years, in part by outsourcing. For other local life sciences firms, that's a fat pitch for new business. But it's not clear if non-Lilly firms can grow fast enough to offset the jobs and wages Indianapolis will lose from Lilly.
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Lilly under gun to replace aging blockbuster ZyprexaRestricted Content

November 5, 2007
J.K. Wall
There's a $2 billion hole in Eli Lilly and Co.'s future. That's roughly how much pretax profit Lilly derives each year from its best-seller, Zyprexa, according to calculations by IBJ. And it's how much black ink will start running off Lilly's books once Zyprexa's U.S. and European patents expire in 2011.
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Taurel draws fire for getting rich while stock strugglesRestricted Content

May 28, 2007
J.K. Wall
Eli Lilly and Co. stock has returned just 1 percent per year in the nine years since CEO Sidney Taurel took office. Meanwhile, Taurel has taken home $44 million in pay and been given stock options valued at $114 million more. But most Lilly shareholders aren't raising a call for Taurel to hit the trail.
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  1. PJ - Mall operators like Simon, and most developers/ land owners, establish individual legal entities for each property to avoid having a problem location sink the ship, or simply structure the note to exclude anything but the property acting as collateral. Usually both. The big banks that lend are big boys that know the risks and aren't mad at Simon for forking over the deed and walking away.

  2. Do any of the East side residence think that Macy, JC Penny's and the other national tenants would have letft the mall if they were making money?? I have read several post about how Simon neglected the property but it sounds like the Eastsiders stopped shopping at the mall even when it was full with all of the national retailers that you want to come back to the mall. I used to work at the Dick's at Washington Square and I know for a fact it's the worst performing Dick's in the Indianapolis market. You better start shopping there before it closes also.

  3. How can any company that has the cash and other assets be allowed to simply foreclose and not pay the debt? Simon, pay the debt and sell the property yourself. Don't just stiff the bank with the loan and require them to find a buyer.

  4. If you only knew....

  5. The proposal is structured in such a way that a private company (who has competitors in the marketplace) has struck a deal to get "financing" through utility ratepayers via IPL. Competitors to BlueIndy are at disadvantage now. The story isn't "how green can we be" but how creative "financing" through captive ratepayers benefits a company whose proposal should sink or float in the competitive marketplace without customer funding. If it was a great idea there would be financing available. IBJ needs to be doing a story on the utility ratemaking piece of this (which is pretty complicated) but instead it suggests that folks are whining about paying for being green.

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