IBJNews

IPS chief White a finalist for top job at Alabama system

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

Eugene White, superintendent of Indianapolis Public Schools, has been named a finalist to lead the Mobile County Public Schools system in Alabama, and he is interviewing for another superintendent’s post in South Carolina.

White was reported as one of three finalists in Mobile by the Press-Register of Mobile, Ala., on Tuesday morning. All three will be invited to interviews on March 27 and 28, with the school board expected to choose a winner by March 30.

In Greenville, S.C., the county school board is interviewing White and other candidates in order to narrow the field to three finalists by Thursday, according to the Greenville News. The school board hopes to name a new superintendent by March 24.

White, 64, has been superintendent of IPS since 2005 and before that was superintendent of the Washington Township schools in Indianapolis for 11 years.

White is a native of Alabama, where he starred in high school and college basketball.

The three finalists in Mobile were culled from a total of 72 applications, according to the Press-Register. The two other finalists are Peggy Connell, the chief academic officer of the 32,000-student Muscogee County schools in Columbus, Ga., and Dale Robbins, associate superintendent for teaching and learning of the 167,000-student Gwinett County schools near Atlanta.

One alternate finalist, according to the Press-Register, is Karyle Green, superintendent of the 9,500-student East Allen County Schools near Fort Wayne.

The Mobile schools serve 61,000 students, nearly twice as many as IPS. In South Carolina, the Greenville County Schools includes about 70,000 students.

Under White’s tenure, IPS has increased its graduation rate by nearly 20 percentage points, to 65 percent last year. He has also spurred IPS to launch a host of innovative magnet schools that can draw students from throughout the district.

However, the State Board of Education last summer judged four of its schools to be persistently failing, and decided to remove them from IPS control in favor of private school management companies.

White has worked both with and against some of the education reform efforts that have become prominent in Indianapolis.

Under White, IPS was an early adopter of such alternative teacher training programs as Teach for America and the New Teacher Project to Indianapolis, which were brought to Indianapolis by the education reform group The Mind Trust.

But, last year, White resigned from The Mind Trust’s board when the group started to advocate for giving Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard authority to appoint IPS school board members.

And at the end of the year, White accused The Mind Trust and Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard of trying to “flood” IPS with charter schools. He also dismissed The Mind Trust’s efforts to put Ballard in charge of the IPS school board and to gut what it called the “bloated bureaucracy” of the district’s central office.

ADVERTISEMENT

  • oh yeah...
    "...Enough mischief has been done here"

    I'm sure you mean 'enough crimes by corrupt Repugnant politicians have been done here'
  • Explain something to me
    So, if this guy was my employee and I knew he was looking around, I'd fire him. Tell me why he's still employed?
  • Good
    I hope they choose him. Good Riddance..
  • The time is right!
    The time is right for him to go. Enough mischief has been done here.

    Post a comment to this story

    COMMENTS POLICY
    We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
     
    You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
     
    Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in IBJ editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
     
    No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
     
    We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
     

    Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

    Sponsored by
    ADVERTISEMENT

    facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

    Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
    Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
     
    Subscribe to IBJ
    1. PJ - Mall operators like Simon, and most developers/ land owners, establish individual legal entities for each property to avoid having a problem location sink the ship, or simply structure the note to exclude anything but the property acting as collateral. Usually both. The big banks that lend are big boys that know the risks and aren't mad at Simon for forking over the deed and walking away.

    2. Do any of the East side residence think that Macy, JC Penny's and the other national tenants would have letft the mall if they were making money?? I have read several post about how Simon neglected the property but it sounds like the Eastsiders stopped shopping at the mall even when it was full with all of the national retailers that you want to come back to the mall. I used to work at the Dick's at Washington Square and I know for a fact it's the worst performing Dick's in the Indianapolis market. You better start shopping there before it closes also.

    3. How can any company that has the cash and other assets be allowed to simply foreclose and not pay the debt? Simon, pay the debt and sell the property yourself. Don't just stiff the bank with the loan and require them to find a buyer.

    4. If you only knew....

    5. The proposal is structured in such a way that a private company (who has competitors in the marketplace) has struck a deal to get "financing" through utility ratepayers via IPL. Competitors to BlueIndy are at disadvantage now. The story isn't "how green can we be" but how creative "financing" through captive ratepayers benefits a company whose proposal should sink or float in the competitive marketplace without customer funding. If it was a great idea there would be financing available. IBJ needs to be doing a story on the utility ratemaking piece of this (which is pretty complicated) but instead it suggests that folks are whining about paying for being green.

    ADVERTISEMENT