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2011 NEWSMAKER: Melangton gears up for Indy's big game

IBJ Staff
December 24, 2011
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Indianapolis Super Bowl Host Committee CEO Allison Melangton began 2011 with a trip to Dallas to see firsthand how the NFL pulls off its big game.

Melangton also went to the 2010 Super Bowl in Miami, but this year she and some of her staff were embedded into Dallas’ organizing committee to get a closer look.

Melangton also got to see what winter weather can do to a Super Bowl, as three days of ice, snow and cold cascaded down on the Dallas-Fort Worth area in the days leading up to the match-up between the Green Bay Packers and Pittsburgh Steelers.

Things were so bad that Dallas retail outlets had to close early on the Tuesday and Wednesday before the Super Bowl; some roads and sidewalks in the area were still impassible on Thursday and Friday.

Melangton-Allison-mug Melangton

Melangton, along with Indianapolis Host Committee Chairman Mark Miles and Mayor Greg Ballard, worked with NFL officials shortly after the 2011 game to put together a more robust plan for dealing with almost any weather problem that might arise in Indianapolis during the first week of February 2012. Super Bowl XLVI is slated for Feb. 5 in Lucas Oil Stadium.

“We obviously saw things in Dallas we never thought we would,” Melangton said. “It was a good lesson on the importance of preparedness. We were prepared before Dallas, but afterward we were even more prepared. We are confident we are ready.”

The woman chosen as CEO of the city’s Super Bowl host committee wasn’t exactly a household name when she took the position in late 2008.

Melangton, 47, is charged with organizing every aspect of the event, including putting together a staff of about 15 full-time paid employees and recruiting and organizing more than 8,000 volunteers.

Melangton, a native of Maine, came to Indianapolis in 1983 to work for USA Gymnastics before joining the Indiana Sports Corp. staff in 1994. She eventually became a senior vice president in charge of such events as the men’s and women’s Big Ten basketball championships; NCAA Final Fours; and Olympic swimming, diving and wrestling trials.•

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  1. The deductible is entirely paid by the POWER account. No one ever has to contribute more than $25/month into the POWER account and it is often less. The only cost not paid out of the POWER account is the ER copay ($8-25) for non-emergent use of the ER. And under HIP 2.0, if a member calls the toll-free, 24 hour nurse line, and the nurse tells them to go to the ER, the copay is waived. It's also waived if the member is admitted to the hospital. Honestly, although it is certainly not "free" - I think Indiana has created a decent plan for the currently uninsured. Also consider that if a member obtains preventive care, she can lower her monthly contribution for the next year. Non-profits may pay up to 75% of the contribution on behalf of the member, and the member's employer may pay up to 50% of the contribution.

  2. I wonder if the governor could multi-task and talk to CMS about helping Indiana get our state based exchange going so Hoosiers don't lose subsidy if the court decision holds. One option I've seen is for states to contract with healthcare.gov. Or maybe Indiana isn't really interested in healthcare insurance coverage for Hoosiers.

  3. So, how much did either of YOU contribute? HGH Thank you Mr. Ozdemir for your investments in this city and your contribution to the arts.

  4. So heres brilliant planning for you...build a $30 M sports complex with tax dollars, yet send all the hotel tax revenue to Carmel and Fishers. Westfield will unlikely never see a payback but the hotel "centers" of Carmel and Fishers will get rich. Lousy strategy Andy Cook!

  5. AlanB, this is how it works...A corporate welfare queen makes a tiny contribution to the arts and gets tons of positive media from outlets like the IBJ. In turn, they are more easily to get their 10s of millions of dollars of corporate welfare (ironically from the same people who are against welfare for humans).

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