Salesforce to help workers leave Texas over abortion law

The CEO of Salesforce said the company will help employees leave Texas, and he did so while retweeting a story linking the offer to concern about Texas’ new anti-abortion law.

Salesforce, which sells customer-management software and has major operations in Indianapolis, joins a small number of companies that have reacted against the Texas law.

CNBC reported that the San Francisco-based company told employees in a Slack message it will help them relocate from Texas, where the company has about 2,000 employees in Dallas.

“These are incredibly personal issues that directly impact many of us—especially women,” the message said. “We recognize and respect that we all have deeply held and different perspectives. As a company, we stand with all of our women at Salesforce and everywhere. … With that being said, if you have concerns about access to reproductive healthcare in your state, Salesforce will help relocate you and members of your immediate family,”

On Friday night, CEO Marc Benioff retweeted a post about the story, adding, “Ohana if you want to move we’ll help you exit TX. Your choice.” Ohana is a Hawaiian term for family.

The company did not return messages for comment.

Salesforce has about 65,000 employees worldwide and operations in about 16 U.S. cities. About 2,000 Salesforce Marketing Cloud employees are based in Indianapolis.

The Texas law passed the Republican-controlled state Legislature and was signed by Republican Gov. Greg Abbott in May but didn’t go into effect until this month. It bans most abortions after six weeks, before many women know whether they are pregnant, and lets private residents sue anyone who helps a woman get an abortion.

By a 5-4 vote, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to block the law. This week the U.S. Justice Department sued Texas to block the law.

Ride-hailing companies Uber and Lyft, both based in San Francisco, have said they will pay legal fees for any drivers who are sued for taking a woman to an abortion clinic. Dating-app provider Bumble, which is based in Texas, said it will create a relief fund for people affected by the law.

Abortion-rights activists have pressured Texas-based companies to criticize the law, but most have remained silent.

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18 thoughts on “Salesforce to help workers leave Texas over abortion law

  1. Don’t let the screen door hit ’em in the ass on the way out if they want to leave Indiana, should Indiana seek to protect the unborn in the same manner…and should.

    How a culture can slaughter 60,000,000 innocents in the womb -and counting- on one hand and then wonder why there is such disrepect for life contributing to our horrible murder rate in Indianapolis defies logic.

    1. You do not get to push your personal understanding of a text on all of society.

      The bible states life begins at first breath…. why do you get to make up an understanding and then push it on all of society?

    2. Bob’s “respect for life” ends when the baby exits the birth canal.

      You know, Bob, making contraception more available (ex. Free IUD’s for any teens who wants them) and actual effective sex education would lead to less unintended pregnancies … which would lead to less abortions.

      Maybe it’s more about controlling people’s behavior than the abortions.

    3. Every child in the womb needs all of us to fight for them, as they don’t receive a vote….regardless of whether Saleseforce.com moves out of states.

  2. James, there is no Scriptural basis of any kind for abortion and only Scriptural basis against it (Isa. 44, 24; Ex. 21, 22; Ps. 131, 19; Lk 1, 41-44). Which is why all the major Christian traditions have opposed it morally for centuries, just as we oppose other social injustices. And for centuries nation states also protected the unborn. Criminal statutes still do consider it “murder” if the life is taken by someone other than the mother! How insanely ironic! Only in recent decades have there been any fringe interpretations of Scripture and morality (with the emergence of the sexual revolution and the explosion of “unwanted pregnancies”). More importantly, SCIENCE clearly reveals, that it is a human being in the womb. An innocent human being. Lastly, I politely suggest that you read the story of Shelley Thornton. She is “baby Roe” (the child, the human being who was not aborted because she was born before the Supreme decided Roe v. Wade).

    1. Steve – you may want to look at this article.

      “One of the most durable myths in recent history is that the religious right, the coalition of conservative evangelicals and fundamentalists, emerged as a political movement in response to the U.S. Supreme Court’s 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling legalizing abortion. The tale goes something like this: Evangelicals, who had been politically quiescent for decades, were so morally outraged by Roe that they resolved to organize in order to overturn it.”

      “This myth of origins is oft repeated by the movement’s leaders. In his 2005 book, Jerry Falwell, the firebrand fundamentalist preacher, recounts his distress upon reading about the ruling in the Jan. 23, 1973, edition of the Lynchburg News: “I sat there staring at the Roe v. Wade story,” Falwell writes, “growing more and more fearful of the consequences of the Supreme Court’s act and wondering why so few voices had been raised against it.” Evangelicals, he decided, needed to organize.”

      “Some of these anti- Roe crusaders even went so far as to call themselves “new abolitionists,” invoking their antebellum predecessors who had fought to eradicate slavery.”

      “But the abortion myth quickly collapses under historical scrutiny. In fact, it wasn’t until 1979—a full six years after Roe—that evangelical leaders, at the behest of conservative activist Paul Weyrich, seized on abortion not for moral reasons, but as a rallying-cry to deny President Jimmy Carter a second term. Why? Because the anti-abortion crusade was more palatable than the religious right’s real motive: protecting segregated schools. So much for the new abolitionism.“

      https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2014/05/religious-right-real-origins-107133/

    2. Bob, feel free to refute any of it.

      Tell me about your support for health care for the poor. Because just today you were telling me how awful the Affordable Care Act is.

      If you supported repeal/“replace”, you’re not actually pro life. You don’t yank away the healthcare for 20 million people with no substitute and then get to claim that you’re pro life.

    3. Bob, I’ve seen plenty of your comments here.

      It’s all well and good to beat on Democrats for supporting the right to abortion. Abortion is bad, I agree.

      But getting rid of abortion will just less women to go back to back alleys where they will get maimed or killed.

      Give people birth control, let them control when they get pregnant, and voila, far less abortions.

      None of the people who want to stop abortions ever want to use their clout to push more available birth control through. They just want to ban abortions. So that tells me it’s really not about abortion, it’s not about the baby even, it’s about something else.

  3. So now we know what is most important to Saleforce and their CEO; the ability to end an innocent life.
    Do they offer the same for anything else an employee disagrees with?

    1. I actually read it as a CEO supporting the personal decisions of his employees and offering assistance to allow them to live in another state.

    2. You wonder if Salesforce would offer assistance NOW to employees wanting to move TO Texas because of the new law….you know, to “support their personal decisions.” I’m not holding my breath.

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