Articles

Rising tuition fuels Lumina’s reform agenda

The 7-year-old Lumina Foundation, formed as part of the sale of USA Group, is on a radical mission-to overhaul the way higher
education is funded in this country. The not-for-profit believes the nation’s economic future depends on making college more
affordable, and accessible.

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Charter designs require creativity: Local architect Axis building school niche

Much of what defines a charter school is in sharp contrast with the traditional model found in public school districts. And the differences start with the structure itself. Charter schools, due to budget restraints, typically involve renovations of a buildings once used for entirely different purposes. From there, the architecture and interior design must create a look and functionality educators say enhances learning and instills in students a sense of ownership and pride in their eventual alma mater. “No one…

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New high school puts focus on workplace: Cristo Rey gives students taste of real employment

Terry Majors wants to make a name for himself in the business community, and he’s confident he’s well on his way to being successful. Making eye contact, he shakes hands firmly and confidently. He’s dressed neatly and professionally in a white, buttondown shirt and tie. His shoes are well-polished. He speaks in a friendly, yet authoritative, voice about a new job he will soon start. “It’s all about choices,” he says philosophically of life, as if he’s been making choices…

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City’s relocation from Sherman Park raising concerns: Indianapolis moving departments from blighted area

When the city of Indianapolis relocates two of its departments later this year from Sherman Park on the near east side to 1200 S. Madison Ave., some say the city is merely trading one blighted area for another-and abandoning a neighborhood it has said it wants to help. And over the 10-year lease with Pillar Investments LLC, owner of the Madison Avenue property, the city will pay nearly $1.2 million more in rent than it would had it stayed at…

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New kind of high school pairs projects, technology: Educators hope approach boosts graduation rates

Students at three new Indiana high schools this fall are going to learn the California way. No, they won’t be holding classes on the beach. They’ll use technology and a project-oriented curriculum to learn about math, science and history, plus gain 21st century skills business leaders say today’s work force needs. The New Technology High School model, which began in Napa Valley, Calif., in 1996, will launch in Indiana this fall with New Tech High at Arsenal Tech, New Tech…

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Some Indiana colleges revolt against survey: U.S. News’ peer assessments called too subjective

The influential U.S. News & World Report college rankings come out next month, a rite of summer that causes many college administrators to groan. Some administrators in Indiana and elsewhere, in fact, have grown so disenchanted with the survey-and see it as so flawed-that they have decided they’ll no longer participate in at least part of it after this year. Nearly 100 private schools nationwide-including DePauw University and Earlham College in Indiana-are pulling out of the peer-assessment portion of the…

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BREAKING: KB Home to exit Indianapolis market

KB Home Inc. is pulling out of the Indianapolis market, a spokesman for the Los Angeles-based homebuilder confirmed this afternoon. The company was the fourth-biggest homebuilder in the Indianapolis area in 2005, ranked by permits filed, according to IBJ’s Book of Lists. However, in recent quarters the housing slowdown has taken a toll on it […]

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Snyder crams for job as Ivy Tech president

In the three months since being named president of Ivy Tech Community College, Tom Snyder
has read up on the school’s history and held meetings with 4,000 faculty, students and others to gain insight into the school.
He’s also made decisions about hiring, cost-cutting and student services.

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Autism’s rise challenges local agencies: Those with disorder face difficulties in locating meaningful employment

Experts haven’t pinpointed the exact reason, but they do know one thing-the rate at which children are being diagnosed with autism has been rising. About one child in 150 is diagnosed by the age of 8 with autism or a related autism spectrum disorder such as Asperger’s syndrome, according to a recent study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That rate is up about 10 times from the 1980s. Experts have a variety of theories to explain the…

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ITT’s youthful CEO has large shoes to fill

Kevin Modany, CEO of ITT Educational Services Inc., carries an iPod and downloads drum solo videos from YouTube. But when
Modany, a young-looking 40-year-old, talks about ITT’s 35-percent increase in first-quarter profit, he comes across as savvy
and confident of his ability to take the post-secondary education provider to even greater heights.

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New Glick exec puts expansion on agenda

It can be intimidating to be tapped by a legend and charged with growing one of central Indiana’s best-known companies. But
David Barrett, three weeks into his role as executive vice president of Gene B. Glick Co. and less than half the age of its
still-working founder, says he isn’t the least bit nervous.

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State’s big colleges don’t lead way in presidential pay: Chiefs at IU, Purdue, Ball State haven’t crossed half-million-dollar mark, but there are perks aplenty

Competition for top college presidents is intense these days. But neither Indiana University nor Purdue University trustees appear willing to break the bank to make sure they’re landing the right leader. About one in six of the public universities surveyed by the Chronicle of Higher Education now pays its president more than $500,000. That’s well above the $400,000 IU’s new leader, Michael McRobbie, will collect-though his wife, Laurie Burns McRobbie, will receive another $90,000 for her efforts to support and…

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Hospital accepts loss for improving heart attack care:

St. Francis Hospital officials have found that improving care and cutting costs to treat heart attack patients comes at an unexpected price. A new program cut the hospital’s time to treat patients and reduced the size of the heart attack-saving $9,400 per admission. But reimbursement by insurance companies dropped $9,715, resulting in the hospital losing $315 per admission. “The pay for quality and pay for performance issue under the current reimbursement structure is not designed to reward quality of care,”…

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Reform push casts cloud over booming Sallie Mae:

Shares of Sallie Mae, one of Hamilton County’s biggest employers, have fallen more than 25 percent over the past year as investors fret that Congress will overhaul the student-loan industry, halving interest rates and bringing the company’s boom times to an end. Momentum for an industry overhaul has been building since Democrats gained control of Congress in November. Concerns peaked in February when President Bush submitted a budget proposal that included cuts in industry subsidies. Changes under consideration could whack…

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Carmel unveils plans for $80M performing arts center: Designs include major orchestra hall laden with state-of-art acoustical design features, plus 500-seat theater

The seats in the new Carmel Performing Arts Center will be designed so music will be acoustically unaffected whether people are sitting in them or not. The walls and jutting upper-level balconies will be curved so sound waves wrap around the hall, preventing sound from becoming focused in a single spot. A suspended reflective canopy will be raised or lowered depending on the number and types of instruments being played so reverberation time stays perfect at all times, thus doing…

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Observers like Ivy Tech choice

Ivy Tech Community College’s choice of businessman Tom Snyder as its new president bodes well for Indiana’s health care and manufacturing industries, observers say. The school’s nursing program will greatly benefit in part because Snyder served on the board of St. John’s Hospital in Anderson before it was acquired by St. Vincent Health several years […]

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Rivals tangle over impact of new hospitals: Health care providers disagree on how head-to-head competition will affect costs

Once joined at the hip, the two main health care providers in Tippecanoe County-Arnett Health System and Greater Lafayette Health Services-have become fierce rivals. Each is building a new hospital and will compete to provide services for the 154,000 county residents, and tens of thousands more in surrounding counties. Lafayette-based Arnett, a multi-specialty medical practice, has 140 doctors at a dozen area locations, plus eight facilities in other parts of the state. Greater Lafayette Health Services, part of Mishawaka-based Sisters…

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IU turns donated beach property into lesson

Indiana University Kelley School of Business students will market and sell five lots along a strip of white sandy beach on
secluded Dog Island, Fla., as a class project that likely will span
several semesters. Whatever the students get for the land will be all profit.

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Development experts cheer McRobbie appointment

The anticipated selection today of Michael McRobbie as the next president of Indiana University is being greeted enthusiastically by Indiana economic development experts. McRobbie, interim provost of Indiana University’s Bloomington campus and vice president for academic affairs, is expected to maintain a higher profile and act more aggressively than outgoing Adam Herbert to help build […]

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IU ready to pick insider for president’s job

Indiana University appears poised to choose an internal candidate as president for the first time in 35 years . The decision
could be announced within days. Two IU trustees confirmed that finalists include Michael McRobbie and Ora Pescovitz, well-known
IU administrators.

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