Articles

College Summit’s goal is more skilled workers

Business leaders and educators agree on what’s needed to improve Indiana’s economic health and enhance its place in the global
economy: a larger pool of skilled workers. Toward that end, a group of notfor-profits is expanding a program to get more low-income
Indianapolis students to further their education after high school.

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College endowments growing, but so is tuition

Endowments at Indiana colleges and universities are soaring, due in part to impressive investment returns in recent years.
The swelling coffers here and across the nation are stoking the debate over whether universities should be using more of their
wealth to hold down tuition increases.

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Retiring baby boomers create openings for new grads

Students donning caps and gowns this May will find jobs aplenty, college career officers and others say. Some industries–like
health care, accounting, engineering, computer science and sales–are more flush with jobs than others. But students receiving
liberal arts degrees also are in high demand because of their well-rounded education.

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New students, locations propel ITT profit

ITT Educational Services Inc. reported today that fourth-quarter profit shot up 18.6 percent, to $48.5 million, on rising enrollment and the opening of new locations. The Carmel-based operator of technical schools said revenue was $230.4 million, up 11.7 percent from the year-ago period. The $1.20 per share in profit exceeded the $1.17 anticipated by analysts […]

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Upscale mainstay Glass Chimney ending its 32-year run

Lured to America in 1967 by brothers who owned restaurants in Cincinnati and Indianapolis, Dieter Puska has spent the past
32 years–nearly half his life–as owner and chef of the elegant Glass Chimney restaurant in Carmel. So it was a bittersweet
moment when he told his employees this month that he is hanging up his chef’s coat and giving up his 70-hour workweeks to
retire.

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Few stocks avoid effect of housing, banking woes: Wall Street pessimism spreading across industries

Nineteen central Indiana companies have seen their stock prices fall more than one-quarter from the 52-week highs-a plunge that largely reflects pessimism over the strength of the economy. The pullback has hammered some of the top-performing Hoosier companies in recent years, including shopping mall owner Simon Property Group Inc. (off $46 a share, or 38 percent) and school operator ITT Educational Services Inc. (off $52, or 39 percent). Former highfliers often take the biggest tumble when investor sentiment turns bearish….

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Fellowship’s formula could grow teachers: Indiana piloting program aimed at boosting math, science educators

Four Indiana universities have been chosen to participate in a prestigious new national fellowship program aimed at increasing the number of math and science teachers while serving as the pilot program for overhauling education nationwide. The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, of Princeton, N.J., selected Indiana as the first state for its program. It chose IUPUI, Ball State University, University of Indianapolis and Purdue University to launch the one-year fellowships and churn out the first wave of new teachers. The…

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Schools bring business into the classroom: Students learn from CEOs, race-car drivers, others

When Marian College asked racecar driver Michael Crawford to help launch the school’s entrepreneur-in-residence program and mentor students about realworld business, he wasn’t sure if it was such a great idea. “My hesitation was I didn’t want to pursue it right away,” Crawford said. “What happens if I go out of business? That would be embarrassing.” But he decided to do it because he believes his experience as an entrepreneur is more realistic than anything the students will read about…

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Businesses, educators teaming up for education: Two sides join forces with Common Goal initiative, which aims to reduce Marion County’s dropout rate

Business and education leaders are hanging up their boxing gloves in favor of working together to stem the local high school dropout rate. “We’ve typically been at odds with the education community,” said Roland Dorson, president of the Greater Indianapolis Chamber of Commerce. Long-standing finger pointing has had businesses issuing mandates that schools educate their students better and educators claiming they don’t receive the help they need from businesses, Dorson said. “We get beat up by business and professional groups…

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State economy will improve, Ball State forecasts

Indiana will experience rising wages along with low inflation and unemployment in 2008 as the economy improves from a sluggish 2007, two Ball State University economists predicted yesterday in the university’s annual forecast. Michael Hicks, whose column about the economy appears in IBJ, and Gary Santoni said high oil prices and worries concerning the subprime […]

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What’s new is old for Brooks: Former U.S. attorney finding familiar ground in Ivy Tech positions

Susan Brooks seems to have returned to her roots in her new role with Ivy Tech Community College. The former U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Indiana began Oct. 1 leading the post-secondary educational institution’s work force and economic development functions, as well as becoming its general counsel. Brooks spent her growing-up years in Fort Wayne watching her father, a high school teacher and football coach, push his students and players on the football field and in the classroom….

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Design Build Institute hoping to spur flood of projects:

Public entities, like school districts and universities, are not known for being risk takers. Some even call them “risk averse.” So, those in the architectural and construction industries aren’t surprised that a state law passed two years ago allowing public entities to use the design-build process is only now taking hold. Design-build lets the owner hire one team to carry out both the design and construction of a project-unlike the traditional design-bid-build process in which the owner commissions architectural plans,…

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Washington Township tests anti-tax mood

A north-side Marion County school district is reigniting the property-tax furor by rolling out a plan to spend as much as
$200 million on renovations and new construction. Washington Township is the first school district in the county to unveil
major capital projects since residents howled in protest last summer against property-tax increases that averaged 35 percent.

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New leader aims to keep school, students growing: More businesses support private north-side institution

What began in 1994 as a six-room schoolhouse with 38 students has grown into a three-building campus with 602 pupils. The growth of the International School of Indiana, which welcomed a new headmaster this year, has been possible because of increased support from an expanding flock of businesses. They believe in its mission: to help attract scientists and executives from around the world to this community by providing a global education for their children. Before the school opened, recalled Eli…

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Chief of policy group to lead Lumina

Lumina Foundation for Education today named Jamie Merisotis as CEO of the Indianapolis-based not-for-profit. Merisotis, 43, is founding president of the Washington D.C.-based Institute for Higher Education Policy, a research and policy center. He replaces Martha Lamkin, who will retire at the end of this year. Lumina, which has $1.4 billion in assets, advocates reforms to […]

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