Indianapolis Business Journal

Oct. 13-19, 2023

Election Day is just weeks away, and incumbent Indianapolis Mayor Joe Hogsett and Republican Jefferson Shreve are making their last arguments to voters about why they should lead the city. IBJ's Taylor Wooten spent time with both to write stories about their proposals and goals for Indianapolis. Plus, Cummins Inc. started investing in hydrogen power four years ago with a lot of optimism but little uncertainty about whether those investments would pay off. Today, that hydrogen looks like an increasingly good bet. Also in this week's issue, Forefront and Indiana Lawyer's Diversity in Law publication.

Read More

OCT. 6-12, 2023

Mayor Jim Brainard has had such a massive influence on the evolution of Carmel over his 27 years in office that the candidates now running to succeed him must figure out how to present their plans for a new era of leadership in ways that jibe with his legacy. Reporter Daniel Bradley has more. Also in this week’s issue, Mickey Shuey reports on efforts to craft a comprehensive redevelopment plan for Indiana Avenue. And Peter Blanchard examines concerns that Indiana still isn’t producing enough highly skilled workers to work in high-tech fields such as artificial intelligence, data visualization and cybersecurity.

Read More

SEPT. 29-OCT. 5, 2023

The total eclipse that will be visible in central Indiana this April presents a huge opportunity for the area’s tourism industry. Susan Orr details how big cities and small towns are trying to take advantage. Also in this week’s issue, Peter Blanchard picks the brain of Vanessa Green Sinders, the first female president of the Indiana Chamber of Commerce in its 100-year history. And David Lindquist gets a read on the sudden reemergence of independent bookstores in Indianapolis.

Read More

SEPT. 22-28, 2023

The latest issue of IBJ is packed with stories on the new relevancy and accessibility of artificial intelligence, now that the technology has taken a transformative step. We have stories about AI’s potential impact on the Hoosier workforce, how artists and pharmaceutical developers are using the technology, how schools are preparing students for the future of AI, and how Indiana and other states are approaching potential regulation of AI.

Read More

SEPT. 15-21, 2023

Everybody loves vibrant neighborhoods and a good comeback story, but residents of the resurgent Riverside neighborhood are concerned about a corresponding rise in their property taxes. Taylor Wooten reports on a city pilot program that could grant them some grace. Also in this week’s issue, Mickey Shuey reports that Mayor Joe Hogsett’s administration has decided against redeveloping the City-County Building and instead will consolidate offices from around the city into the 28-story monolith. And Peter Blanchard examines the national bidding war for big manufacturing projects that pits Indiana against states across the country and drives up the cost of incentive packages.

Read More

SEPT. 8-14, 2023

As Mina Starsiak Hawk wraps up production of HGTV home-reno staple “Good Bones,” she’s airing her frustration with Indianapolis’ Department of Metropolitan Development and Department of Business and Neighborhood Services. Dave Lindquist details how Hawk’s company butted heads with city planners and how they’re responding. Also in this week’s issue, Megan Fernandez explains how the founder and CEO of medical-device-software firm Greenlight Guru has created a world-class training arena for youth basketball players in Indianapolis. And John Russell outlines how independent physicians in Indiana are teaming up to push back against regulatory and economic pressures.

Read More

SEPT. 1-7, 2023

NXG Youth Motorsports teaches children of color and from underprivileged backgrounds about the racing industry through karting and science. Mickey Shuey reports that the not-for-profit is on the verge of a major expansion with a new site and new programs. Also in this week’s issue, Susan Orr takes the temperature of the tech community to see if it’s recovering from the slowdown earlier in the year. And Taylor Wooten reports that Mayor Hogsett’s administration faces an uphill battle with its proposal to change the state road funding formula that now strgly favors rural areas.

Read More

AUG. 25-31, 2023

Seventeen Indiana companies are helping NASA return astronauts to the moon—and to achieve even grander goals after that. Susan Orr spotlights the firms supporting the Artemis program. Also in this week’s issue, Taylor Wooten reports that central Indiana employers are increasingly relying on new hires with criminal records to fill open positions amid the nationwide worker shortage. And Mickey Shuey has the latest on the burgeoning North Mass district northeast of downtown, which is rehabilitating its reputation as a post-industrial eyesore.

Read More

AUG. 18-24, 2023

A decade ago, Eli Lilly and Co. struggled to release new drugs and maintain investor interest. Today, the company is literally worth more than all of the gold in Fort Knox as its stock price continually posts new highs and analysts praise its pipeline of drugs. John Russell explores what this means for the company and Indianapolis. Also in this week’s issue, John Russell reports that one of the top researchers at Indiana University School of Medicine has been recruited away from the institution and taken more than two dozen faculty, postdoctoral associates and IU staffers with him. And Susan Orr highlights the fight against fake online consumer reviews and how the Federal Trade Commission wants to get involved.

Read More

AUG. 11-17, 2023

A month after bar and restaurant owners in Broad Ripple moved their weekend closing times up to 1 a.m., they say they’ve seen a significant reduction in violence in the village. Taylor Wooten examines the effectiveness of the curfew and other measures that business owners and police tried in the wake of a triple homicide. Also in this week’s issue, Dave Lindquist takes a deep dive into Lucas Oil Stadium’s negotiations and preparations to host Taylor Swift’s record-breaking Eras Tour next year. And Daniel Bradley has the latest on the plan from Conner Prairie to expand west across the White River and into Carmel.

Read More

AUG. 4-10, 2023

Central Indiana has no lack of coffee shops, but out-of-state java purveyors believe there’s an unmet appetite for caffeinated beverages in public spaces. Dave Lindquist reports on the latest wave of coffeeshop chains opening stores in the Indy area. Also in this week’s issue, Susan Orr goes behind the scenes of the debut of Rally, a multimillion-dollar business conference intended to bring together entrepreneurs and investors. And Mickey Shuey sheds light on plans to turn the now-vacant John Marshall High School into a neighborhood services hub on the far-east side.

Read More

JULY 28-AUG. 3, 2023

The town of Cicero is right on the shores of Morse Reservoir, but it might as well be 1,000 miles away. Daniel Bradley explains why the town must find underground sources of water if it wants to grow like its Hamilton County neighbors. Also in this week's issue, Taylor Wooten reports on a move by the Indianapolis City-County Council that could lead to the revitalization of the largely vacant Irvington Plaza shopping center. And Dave Lindquist profiles the in-demand videographer who’s responsible for much of what the rest of the nation sees of Indianapolis, via “Good Bones,” “Music in Transit” and documentaries.

Read More

JULY 21-27, 2023

This week's issue is packaged with IBJ Media's second annual Indiana 250. Plus, Mickey Shuey explains why the Imax Theatre at the Indiana State Museum is a special place to see the new movie "Oppenheimer" about the development of the atomic bomb. Taylor Wooten explores the city's new strategy for eliminating nuisance properties, and Sam Stall writes about how the Indiana Economic Development Corp. is trying to do more to help diverse small business owners.

Read More

JULY 14-20, 2023

In the last two years, the Indianapolis arts community has experienced head-spinning turnover at the top of some of its most prominent institutions, including Newfields, Indiana Repertory Theatre, Dance Kaleidoscope and Heartland Film. Dave Lindquist explores how leadership changes can affect an organization’s relationship with existing donors while potentially making inroads with new audiences. Also in this week’s issue, John Russell takes the temperature of Hamilton County’s Riverview Health hospital system, which is dealing with a flood of red ink and competition from larger health care systems. And Susan Orr checks in with Hoosiers who have federal students loans about their concerns as they prepare to restart payments.

Read More

JULY 7-13, 2023

Lawrence’s Democratic city councilors and its Republican mayor are locked in a bitter legal battle over the city’s 2022 budget. Reporter Taylor Wooten has the details. Also in this week’s issue, Peter Blanchard and Mickey Shuey report that state officials are considering using the massive LEAP Lebanon Innovation and Research District as a model for similar economic development projects across the state. And Susan Orr explains how Gleaners Food Bank of Indiana is adopting new technology to strengthen its strategy in the fight against hunger.

Read More

JUNE 30-JULY 6, 2023

Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly and Co. is in the middle of a battle over the future of drug costs as Medicare begins to ramp up a program to negotiate prices with pharmaceutical companies and many in the industry try to derail it or change the terms. John Russell focuses on Lilly's objections to the program. Also in this week's issue, Susan Orr reports that Indianapolis-based Noble Roman’s is battling with one of its largest shareholders over whether its CEO should be replaced on the restaurant company’s board of directors. And Daniel Bradley previews the plan for a split-level roundabout at one of the busiest intersections in Hamilton County.

Read More

JUNE 23-29, 2023

The Republican-dominated Legislature has given Indianapolis a way to raise money for downtown’s post-pandemic revitalization, but there appears to be little chance that Democratic city leaders will pursue it before the November city electon. Taylor Wooten and Peter Blanchard explain their reluctance. Also in this week’s issue, Dave Lindquist profiles the new CEO of Indiana Black Expo. And Greg Weaver reports that business executives are rethinking annual performance reviews and the frequency of employee feedback.

Read More

JUNE 16-22, 2023

Who do you think is responsible when a hospital sends a patient’s diagnosis to the wrong person, and that person immediately posts the diagnosis on Facebook. IBJ’s John Russell has the details from a privacy case involving an Indianapolis resident that has made its way to the Indiana Supreme Court. Also in this week’s issue, Peter Blanchard explains how the state is investing in Warsaw, Indiana, in order to help preserve its critical mass of orthopedic device firms. And IBJ’s latest edition of the Corporate 100 ranks the largest public and private companies in the state.

Read More