Mass Ave tavern Liberty Street makes its last call

Liberty Street at 653 Massachusetts Ave. (Image courtesy of Google)

Liberty Street, a Mass Ave tavern known for its vast selection of bourbons and whiskeys, has closed after seven years in business.

Shawn and Tammy Miller—who also own Dorman Street Saloon—announced Friday on social media that the bar would remain open for just one more day.

“Much like the leaves are turning and the season is changing, our season here is changing as well,” they said. “It’s with heavy, yet happy hearts, we announce that after 7 years, we have decided to close Liberty Street. Our last day will be Saturday.”

The Millers opened the bar at 659 Massachusetts Ave. in 2014 in a flatiron building dating to the 1890s that was formerly occupied by Cajun and Creole restaurant Yats. A portion of Park Avenue, which runs along the east side of the building, was once called Liberty Street, thus providing inspiration for the name.

According to website, Liberty Street carried 300-plus varieties of bourbon, whiskey and scotch on its “Whiskey Wall,” an extensive collection of wine, plus rotating local beers on draft.

The tavern was a go-to spot for historic cocktails like the Sazerac or a Hemingway Daiquiri.

The Corner Stage at Liberty Street also provided an intimate live music setting but performances became infrequent after the pandemic started.

The Millers did not say on Facebook if they had future plans for the site. And they didn’t respond to a request for comment from IBJ.

Please enable JavaScript to view this content.

Story Continues Below

Editor's note: You can comment on IBJ stories by signing in to your IBJ account. If you have not registered, please sign up for a free account now. Please note our updated comment policy that will govern how comments are moderated.

7 thoughts on “Mass Ave tavern Liberty Street makes its last call

  1. That place had such odd operating hours for a tavern on Mass Ave, even before the pandemic. Only went a couple of times and, unfortunately, it didn’t leave much of an impression.

    1. Can’t say I knew this place existed, but odd hours are a consistent problem with the cool, trendy bars downtown and Fountain Square. If I have to say “it’s 9p on a Tuesday, is this bar open?” It gets crossed off my list.

    1. Yup. And Yats was by far more successful than this bar has ever been. I went a couple of times after they opened and it wasn’t great. Their concept seemed confusing, too – was it fine dining? was it bar food? was it a bar? was it a live music venue with a bar?

  2. Always turned off Liberty Street was one of first place to post” We Serve Everyone” signs a few years ago.
    As if there were lots of places in Indy that wouldn’t serve everyone. Woke goes broke.

    1. Yeah, that wasn’t being ‘woke’. It was common sense business. At the time, Indianapolis needed to show people whose business dollars benefit all that the majority of residents welcomed all. That same sex couples could have a great life here too, alongside heterosexual couples, and plenty of employers, landlords and residents wanted them here.

{{ articles_remaining }}
Free {{ article_text }} Remaining
{{ articles_remaining }}
Free {{ article_text }} Remaining Article limit resets in {{ count_down }} days.