Top Biden aide and Indy native Klain expected to leave White House

Ron Klain

White House chief of staff Ron Klain, who has spent more than two years as President Joe Biden’s top aide, is preparing to leave his job in the coming weeks, according to a person familiar with Klain’s plans.

Klain is an Indianapolis native and a 1979 graduate of North Central High School. His expected departure comes not long after the White House and Democrats had a better-than-expected showing in the November elections, buoyed by a series of major legislative accomplishments, including a bipartisan infrastructure bill and a sweeping climate, health care and tax package that all Republicans rejected.

His tenure as chief of staff is the longest for a Democratic president in modern times.

The person familiar with Klain’s plans was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity to confirm the development, which was first reported by the New York Times.

The White House did not return calls or emails seeking comment on Klain’s expected exit.

Now that Republicans have regained a majority in the House, the White House is preparing to shift to a more defensive posture. GOP lawmakers are planning multiple investigations into the Biden administration, examining everything from the chaotic U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan to U.S. border policy. Republicans are are pledging to investigate the president’s son, Hunter Biden.

Klain’s departure also comes as the White House struggles to contain the fallout after classified documents dating from Biden’s time as vice president were discovered at his home in Wilmington, Delaware, and at his former institute in Washington. Attorney General Merrick Garland has appointed a special counsel to investigate the matter.

Among those on the shortlist to succeed Klain include Steve Richetti, counselor to the president; Labor Secretary Marty Walsh; former White House COVID-19 response coordinator Jeff Zients; Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack; and Anita Dunn, a White House senior adviser.

Dunn, who has publicly ruled out interest in the chief of staff job, but would be the first woman in the post. She played a leading role in shaping Biden’s political and communications strategy, including the “ultra-MAGA” framing of Republicans that helped Democrats exceed expectations during the 2022 midterms.

Zients has returned to the White House since running the COVID-19 response team in a low-profile role to ensure the administration is appropriately staffed for the remainder of Biden’s first term. Richetti, a former lobbyist, followed after Klain and senior adviser Bruce Reed as Biden’s final vice presidential chief of staff.

Walsh, Boston’s mayor before joining the Cabinet, earned praise from Biden as recently as Friday for his job performance. Vilsack, a former Iowa governor, is in his second stint as agriculture secretary after serving in the role for the entirety of the Obama administration. He volunteered for Biden during Biden’s ill-fated 1988 presidential bid in Iowa.

Klain, a longtime Democratic political operative, has overseen a West Wing that has been largely free of the high-stakes drama that permeated the upper echelons of the Trump administration. Klain has been an outspoken proponent of Biden’s agenda via Twitter, where he frequently engages with reporters to defend the president’s record.

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7 thoughts on “Top Biden aide and Indy native Klain expected to leave White House

  1. He’s terrible. Listen to any interview. I GUARANTEE it starts out with “Look, blah blah blah….”

    He always sounds very defensive, from the beginning of the interview. Needless to say, I won’t miss Ron.

    1. IBJ cites almost entirely from Washington Post and Associated Press. One can still find traces of neutral reporting with the AP on rare occasion, but usually it’s basically what we expected from the WaPo back in the mid 2000s. Meanwhile, the WaPo is basically about as neutral as Breitbart.

      The intellectual core of the IBJ is beholden to the DC swamp, so it’s no surprise that, when the swamp faces exposure, they’ll cling to legacy media publications that are eager to perpetuate the mirage.

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