Articles

Firm helps area high schools sell themselves

Continental Enterprises, an intellectual property consulting firm, launched a service this summer to help area high schools register their logos, names and mascots as trademarks and establish licensing programs, assuring that schools will get a cut of all merchandise sales bearing their mark. This month, North Central High School, one of the state’s largest, signed with Continental, and six to eight more schools are expected to follow suit within 60 days.

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Murky motive adds intrigue to Old National loan saga

In the buttoned-down world of banking, it doesn't get much stranger than this: An Indianapolis loan officer with a strong reputation is suddenly dismissed after his employer charges he falsified lending documents. The bank says the fraud exposes it to potential losses approaching $20 million. And here's the kicker: The employer hasn't accused the banker of committing the wrongdoing for personal gain.

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CMG Worldwide takes tussle over vintage baseball cards to court

New York Yankees first baseman Lou Gehrig died in 1941 of a disease that came to bear his name. Six years later, second baseman
Jackie Robinson famously broke through baseball’s color barrier with the Brooklyn Dodgers, earning the league minimum $5,000.
He died in 1972. Mark Roesler believes the best earning years still lie ahead for both legendary players, as well as many
others like them. But first he must untangle their image rights in federal court in Indianapolis.

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Monroe photo ruling could sting CMG

Marilyn Monroe, one of celebrity licensing firm CMG Worldwide’s highest-grossing clients, has raked in more than $30 million
in licensing fees in the last dozen years–with roughly 25 percent of that landing in CMG coffers. But that spigot could slow
to a drip if a higher court upholds a ruling early this month by a New York federal judge.

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Three-decade landfill battle rages on

World War II could have been fought seven times over since Ralph Reed and sons first tried to build Mallard Lake Landfill
outside of Anderson. The Reeds’ dream of big cash from trash has
upset hundreds of residents in subdivision-dotted fields since the family asked Madison County to rezone their 254-acre farm
in the 1970s.

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