Indiana working on phosphorous limits for lakes

Indiana's environmental agency is drafting rules intended to improve the water quality of the state's lakes by setting
phosphorous limits for those waterways.

The restrictions being worked on by the Indiana Department of Environmental Management for the nutrient found in lawn fertilizers
and human and animal waste are expected to take about 18 months to draft.

IDEM assistant commissioner Bruno Pigott told The Star Press of Muncie that the rule would impact sewage treatment
plants upstream of lakes. But the agency has not yet determined how far upstream of a lake a treatment plant may be regulated.

Phosphorous can cause fish kills and other problems by fueling algae blooms in lakes.

Environmental scientist Lenore Tedesco of IUPUI said Indiana has dragged its feet on imposing new phosphorous rules.

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