Indy firm launches bedsore weapon

The latest idea from Dr. James Spahn, an Indianapolis health care entrepreneur, should help hospitals and nursing homes do
a better job of preventing severe bedsores, or pressure ulcers. That’s good, because Medicare and private health insurers
increasingly won’t pay to treat them.

Spahn has launched WoundVision, a portable imaging machine that uses heat-sensitive, infrared beams to detect activity under
a patient's skin. The machine produces digital images that can detect and predict pressure ulcers before they’re
visible to the eye.

“As pressure-ulcer incidence continues to rise and cause problems throughout all levels of the health care industry,
caregivers and health care executives are now, more than ever, feeling the need for a long-term solution,” Spahn said
in a statement. “Our imaging system provides an objective and unbiased analysis to support health care providers’
diagnoses and care plans.”

Spahn also leads Indianapolis-based EHOB Inc., which he founded in 1985. It makes Waffle overlays for mattresses, seats and
feet to prevent pressure ulcers.

WoundVision has been in development for 4-1/2 years. In 2008, the federal Medicare program stopped paying hospitals and nursing
homes for the care needed to heal a pressure ulcer that a patient develops while under their care. Private insurers such as
Indianapolis-based WellPoint Inc. also have stopped for such follow-up care.

Please enable JavaScript to view this content.

Story Continues Below

Editor's note: IBJ is now using a new comment system. Your Disqus account will no longer work on the IBJ site. Instead, you can leave a comment on stories by signing in to your IBJ account. If you have not registered, please sign up for a free account now. Past comments are not currently showing up on stories, but they will be added in the coming weeks. Please note our updated comment policy that will govern how comments are moderated.