Indiana Supreme Court upholds state’s voter ID law

The Indiana Supreme Court has upheld the state's voter-identification law in a 4-1 decision.

The majority opinion, announced Wednesday, says the Legislature has the power to require voters to identify themselves at polls using a photo ID.

It's the latest ruling in a string of lawsuits related to the politically charged issue of whether the 2005 law requiring voters to show a government-issued photo ID at the polls is unconstitutional.

The League of Women Voters had argued that the law violates the state constitution because it imposed a requirement on some voters but not all since absentee voters aren't required to prove their identity.

The state appeals court last year had agreed and ruled the law unconstitutional, finding it "regulates voters in a manner that's not uniform and impartial." Supreme Court justices heard arguments on the case in March.

Wednesday's decision does not prevent a voter from challenging the law in the future.

For more, go to IBJ blog NewsTalk.

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