At least six men’s hoops programs to face NCAA allegations

A key NCAA official says six schools are going to be facing allegations of Level I violations as early as next month, the latest fallout in the college basketball corruption scandal.

Stan Wilcox, vice president for regulatory affairs for the Indianapolis-based NCAA, told CBS Sports two high-profile programs will be notified in early July, and the others at a later date.

Level I violations can include such punishments as scholarship reductions, postseason bans and show-cause orders against coaches.

NCAA officials said in a statement that it's likely even more schools will be notified of violations. It did not name any schools.

Yahoo Sports reported Thursday that the schools could include the University of Louisville, North Carolina State, Kansas, Arizona, LSU, USC, Oklahoma State, South Carolina, Auburn, TCU, Creighton and Clemson.

Wilcox told CBS the new cases will be subject to new NCAA policies approved after recommendations made by a commission led by Condoleezza Rice, a former U.S. secretary of state. Wilcox was in Florida participating as a panelist on NCAA issues at the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics convention.

The FBI announced in September 2017 it had indicted 10 people, including four assistant coaches , for bribery and fraud. Prosecutors said coaches teamed with an executive from an apparel maker and others to trade hundreds of thousands of dollars in bribes to influence star athletes' choices of schools, shoe sponsors, agents, even tailors in a widespread recruiting scandal that tainted two dozen schools.

The cases concluded last week when Lamont Evans, a former assistant basketball coach at Oklahoma State and the University of South Carolina, was sentenced to three months in prison for accepting bribes to link top players with bribe-paying managers and financial advisers.

Former Adidas executive James Gatto, business manager Christian Dawkins and amateur league director Merl Code were convicted of conspiracy to commit wire fraud last October for funneling recruits to Louisville, Kansas and North Carolina State.

Wilcox said the NCAA waited to act, at the request of the federal government, until the trials wrapped up.

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