Construction tech-services firm expanding HQ, adding 56 workers

Earthwave Technologies Inc., a provider of wireless fleet-management systems for construction contractors and heavy equipment owners, is expanding its Indianapolis headquarters and plans to add 56 workers over the next five years, the company said Thursday.

The company said it is spending $1.2 million to double its existing 8,000-square-foot office space at 8727 Commerce Park Place, near West 86th Street and Michigan Road on the city’s northwest side.

Work to expand the office and update its information technology infrastructure began in December.

Earthwave, which already has 33 full-time employees in Indiana, said it has started hiring for positions in sales, hardware, software development and customer service.

The Indiana Economic Development Corp. has offered Fleetwatcher LLC, which does business as Earthwave Technologies, up to $595,000 in conditional tax credits and up to $75,000 in training grants, based on the job-creation plans. The incentives hinge on the company’s ability to meet hiring goals.

Founded in 2000, Earthwave developed a wireless fleet-management system called Fleetwatcher that helps heavy-equipment and paving contractors track and manage their equipment, projects and costs by offering real-time access to telematics data from any location.

Earthwave was co-founded by Mike Paredes, a former manager at Circuit City and executive at HHGregg, and Larry Baker, who operated a phone systems firm in Cincinnati. The company got its start under the name Tsunami Wireless.

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