Biden proposes new taxes on rich to help fund Medicare

  • Comments
  • Print

President Joe Biden on Tuesday proposed new taxes on the rich to help fund Medicare, saying the plan would help extend the insurance program’s solvency by 25 years and provide a degree of middle-class stability to millions of older adults.

In his plan, Biden is overtly declaring that the wealthy ought to shoulder a heavier tax burden. His budget would draw a direct line between those new taxes and the popular health insurance program for people older than 65, essentially asking those who’ve fared best in the economy to subsidize the rest of the population.

Biden wants to increase the Medicare tax rate from 3.8% to 5% on income exceeding $400,000 per year, including salaries and capital gains. That would likely increase tax revenues by more than $117 billion over 10 years, according to prior estimates by the Tax Policy Center.

“This modest increase in Medicare contributions from those with the highest incomes will help keep the Medicare program strong for decades to come,” Biden wrote in a Tuesday essay in The New York Times. He called Medicare a “rock-solid guarantee that Americans have counted on to be there for them when they retire.”

The proposed Medicare changes are part of a fuller budget proposal that Biden plans to release on Thursday in Philadelphia. Pushing the proposal through Congress will likely be difficult, with Republicans in control of the House and Democrats holding only a slim majority in the Senate.

The proposal is a direct challenge to GOP lawmakers, who argue that economic growth comes from tax cuts like those pushed through by President Donald Trump in 2017. Those cuts disproportionately favored wealthier households and companies. They contributed to higher budget deficits, when growth failed to boom as Trump had promised and the economy was then derailed in 2020 by the coronavirus pandemic.

The conflicting worldviews on how taxes would impact the economy is part of a broader showdown. Biden and Congress need to reach a deal to raise the government’s borrowing authority at some point this summer, or else the government could default and plunge the U.S. into a debilitating recession.

Ahead of the 2024 campaign season, Democrats have ramped up talk around Medicare, vowing to fend off any Republican attempts to cut the program, although so far the GOP has vowed to avoid any cuts. Still, Republican lawmakers have reached little consensus on how to fulfill their promise to put the government on a path toward balancing the federal budget in the next 10 years.

Last year, members of the House Republican Study Committee proposed raising the eligibility age for Medicare to 67, which would match Social Security. But that idea hasn’t moved forward in a split Congress.

Republicans have denied that they plan to cut the program. A proposal from Sen. Rick Scott, R-Fla., that would require Congress to reconsider all federal laws every five years, including Medicare, has gotten little traction.

Biden’s plan is also intended to close what the White House describes as loopholes that allow people to avoid Medicare taxes on some income. Besides the taxes, Biden wants to expand Medicare’s ability to negotiate drug costs, which began with the Inflation Reduction Act. He signed the sweeping legislation last year.

Taken together, Biden’s new proposals would help shore up a key trust fund that pays for Medicare, which provides health care for older adults. According to the White House, the changes would keep the fund solvent until the 2050s, about 25 years longer than currently expected.

Changes would also be made to Medicare benefits. Biden wants to limit cost sharing for some generic drugs to only $2. The idea would lower out-of-pocket costs for treating hypertension, high cholesterol and other ailments.

In addition, the budget would end cost sharing for up to three mental health or behavioral health visits per year.

Please enable JavaScript to view this content.

Editor's note: You can comment on IBJ stories by signing in to your IBJ account. If you have not registered, please sign up for a free account now. Please note our updated comment policy that will govern how comments are moderated.

13 thoughts on “Biden proposes new taxes on rich to help fund Medicare

  1. Sounds great to me. It’d be great to start having corporations like Amazon, Salesforce, Duke Energy, Nike, and many others pay federal corporate income tax, and share a few of their hefty profits. That would certainly help to fund. Stop having middle-class citizens carry the entire weight of the government budget on their backs.

  2. The Medicare tax needs to be spread to anyone and everyone that will be
    taking Medicare in the future.

    Biden and the Dems are so full of themselves.

    1. Why should somebody making 30k and needing every penny to survive pay the same as somebody that is able to fund a multimillion dollar 401k and still drive a Mercedes? Taxes in the US need to be a little less regressive and make the wealthy do their fair share.

    2. Dan M.

      Right now the vast majority of people are taking more out of Medicare
      than what they contribute.
      Only raising the tax on the rich is utter nonsense and will not solve the
      problem by any stretch of the imagination. It will NOT be nearly enough
      money.

      The increase in the Medicare tax should be a flat rate that everyone
      contributes to.

      This whole social justice mentality is why we are in the mess we are in.

    3. Agreed with Keith B. on that one. It’s pointless to try to single out the wealthy. More laws and thousand page bills will be signed creating legal loopholes. It happens every year.

    1. You’re missing the point Dan. It’s all about politics, not actually raising the tax.

  3. Biden: “This modest increase in Medicare contributions from those with the highest incomes” – since when does increasing a tax by 31.6% qualify as a “modest increase”? Great reporting on that one, AP.

  4. Government waste, fraud, and inefficiencies, costs tax payers millions and millions of $. Instead of debating tax increases there should be a focus on accountability of our money. Remember, it’s not the government’s money that is being wasted, it’s YOUR money given to the government through taxes that is wasted.

    1. You’re not going to make a difference in the US budget with “fraud, waste, and inefficiencies”.

      It was nonsense when Obama said it and it’s nonsense now.

      You’re either cutting the military, Medicare/Medicaid, or Social Security … or you’re increasing revenue (tax increases and collecting everything owed) … or, if you’re actually serious, you’re doing both.

      One party cuts revenue and then claims the only solution is cutting spending …

      … the other only wants to increase revenue and never wants to cut spending …

      Don’t see how one is much worse than the other.

      https://www.cbpp.org/research/federal-budget/where-do-our-federal-tax-dollars-go

Get the best of Indiana business news. ONLY $1/week Subscribe Now

Get the best of Indiana business news. ONLY $1/week Subscribe Now

Get the best of Indiana business news. ONLY $1/week Subscribe Now

Get the best of Indiana business news. ONLY $1/week Subscribe Now

Get the best of Indiana business news.

Limited-time introductory offer for new subscribers

ONLY $1/week

Cancel anytime

Subscribe Now

Already a paid subscriber? Log In

Get the best of Indiana business news.

Limited-time introductory offer for new subscribers

ONLY $1/week

Cancel anytime

Subscribe Now

Already a paid subscriber? Log In

Get the best of Indiana business news.

Limited-time introductory offer for new subscribers

ONLY $1/week

Cancel anytime

Subscribe Now

Already a paid subscriber? Log In

Get the best of Indiana business news.

Limited-time introductory offer for new subscribers

ONLY $1/week

Cancel anytime

Subscribe Now

Already a paid subscriber? Log In