Hotel in downtown Fishers project to fly upscale Tapestry flag

Hotel Nickel Plate
A conceptual rendering of Hotel Nickel Plate. (Image courtesy of city of Fishers)

The $157 million mixed-use project slated for the Nickel Plate District in Fishers will include a five-story, 116-unit hotel under Hilton’s new high-end Tapestry Collection brand.

To be named Hotel Nickel Plate, the lodging property would be located on the south side of 116th Street in downtown Fishers and along the Nickel Plate Trail. Set to open in 2021, it will include a full-service restaurant at ground level.

Indianapolis-based Browning Investments, which is the lead developer of the mixed-used project in the district, plans to co-develop the hotel with Fishers-based Dora Hotel Co. They announced the partnership and their choice of the Tapestry brand on Tuesday.

Tapestry was launched by Hilton in 2017, jumping on the bandwagon in the hospitality industry for small-scale, high-end hotels. They’re intended to feel like one-of-a-kind, independent hotels, each with distinctive elements related to their locations.

A 127-room hotel in the Tapestry portfolio named The Wilshaw Indianapolis—named for Wilbur Shaw, the last native Hoosier to win the Indianapolis 500—has been planned for Speedway with its debut scheduled for third quarter of next year. Hilton already counts more than 25 other locations for the Tapestry brand in the United States and Canada.

Browning’s mixed-use project is slated for the north and south sides of 116th Street in downtown Fishers and is expected to include apartments, town homes, retail space and a six-story office building—in addition to the hotel.

The cost of developing the hotel is part of the $157 million price tag for the full development announced by Browning late last year. A spokesperson said Tuesday that the firm did not have a specific figure for developing the hotel.

The Fishers City Council will consider financial incentives for the hotel project at its Dec. 16 meeting, including waiving impact and permitting fees and reimbursing up to $2.1 million in eligible construction costs, via a tax increment financing fund.

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5 thoughts on “Hotel in downtown Fishers project to fly upscale Tapestry flag

  1. This appears to be quite a departure in building quality/style than what was presented in the original plan. Is there a site plan, showing how this correlates to the First Internet Bank building and it’s associated parking garage?

    1. I assume you don’t mean the conceptual design is a negative departure in comparison to the original concepts. This looks pretty good to me. Definitely has elements of the historic Nickel Plate vibe. Good work Browning/Dora/design team! The real challenge ahead will be for the City’s engineering department to produce a forward-thinking plan on how to get vehicles moving with the increased density. 116th Street from I-69 to Hague Road is destined for gridlock without significant changes to thoroughfare options.

  2. I absolutely agree with Adam. Traffic is frequently very bad, especially during the morning and evening “rush two hours.” With major developments on both sides of 116th at the Monon, it will be very bad most of the time and a nightmare at peak times. Unfortunately, I don’t see any reasonable answer. I sure hope the folks in City Hall find an answer.

    1. I imagine they will be looking for a bailout from INDOT. There’s a convincing argument that the long light cycles at the I-69 ramps contribute significantly to the congestion there.

      But there’s really no way out…there are far too many things generating too many car trips too close to the interstate to solve the problems.

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