Total Indiana COVID deaths climb past 21,000

The Indiana State Department of Health on Tuesday reported 95 more deaths from COVID-19, raising the cumulative pandemic total to 21,079.

Statewide hospitalizations due to COVID-19 were at 2,234 on both Monday and Tuesday, but have plummeted 36.5% since hitting a pandemic high of 3,519 on Jan. 13. COVID patients occupy 22.9% of Indiana’s intensive care unit beds. The state has 19.3% of its ICU beds available overall.

The department reported 3,504 new COVID-19 cases, for a pandemic total of 1,655,125.

Every county in Indiana was colored red on the state’s advisory-level map Tuesday. Red is the highest level on the four-color map, which means every county is seeing at least 200 new cases week per 100,000 residents and a seven-day positivity rate for all tests of 15% or more.

More than 3.65 million Hoosiers had been fully vaccinated against COVID-19 as of Tuesday at 5 a.m. More than 1.68 million Hoosiers have gotten vaccine boosters.

The department said 60.4% of Indiana residents 12 and older and 62.3% of residents 18 and older are fully vaccinated.

COVID-19 cases

New COVID-19 cases: 3,092

Total cumulative cases: 1,655,125

COVID-19 deaths

New deaths: 95

Total cumulative deaths: 21,079

COVID-19 testing

New tested individuals: 3,504

Total cumulative tested individuals: 5,048,652

Cumulative positivity rate unique individuals: 31.5%

Cumulative positivity rate all tests: 10.8%

Seven-day positivity rate unique individuals: 38.6%**

Seven-day positivity rate all tests: 24.7.2%**

** The health department reports the 7-day positivity rates with a six-day lag to allow time for more comprehensive results.

County numbers

Marion County cumulative cases: 220,854 (increase of 304)

Marion County new deaths: 11

Marion County cumulative deaths: 2,713

Marion County 7-day positivity rate unique individuals: 26.8%

Marion County 7-day positivity rate all tests: 19.2%

Hamilton County cumulative cases: 79,835

Hendricks County cumulative cases: 39,946

Johnson County cumulative cases: 41,565

Madison County cumulative cases: 31,954

Boone County cumulative cases: 14,753

Hancock County cumulative cases: 20,298

Morgan County cumulative cases: 16,089

Shelby County cumulative cases: 13,338

COVID-19 vaccinations

Statewide totals (Dec. 14, 2020–Feb. 8, 2022)

First dose administered: 3,741,659 (daily increase of 1,088)

Fully vaccinated: 3,657,218 (daily increase of 2,114)

Booster doses: 1,683,163 (daily increase of 2,029)

Indiana intensive care unit usage

ICU beds in use by COVID-19 patients: 22.9%

Available ICU beds: 22.9%

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11 thoughts on “Total Indiana COVID deaths climb past 21,000

    1. Michael Q., that was quite an intelligent rebuttal!! About what I usually expect from your ilk. Why bother letting any facts derail your “opinions”.

  1. Hey Joe, how about you talk about the hospitals being full and the number of daily deaths nationwide being at all-time highs for the entire pandemic and the total now surpassing 900,000 deaths in the US, which, BTW, has the highest death rate of any 1st world country.

    It’s nice that the rate of new infections is coming down from 1,000,000 a day to 300,000, but that’s still higher than EVER.

    But you just continue going about your business of refusing the vaccine, not wearing a mask, and forcing schools to not have the option to require masks. And let’s just let kids under age 5 and the immunocompromised fend for themselves. Because, you know… it’s *your* free-dumbs we’re talking about.

    Thank you, Republicans!

    1. Hey Randy,… uh, forget it. Not worth taking any time slamming a sky is falling, head-spinning, liberal progressive sheep like yourself.

    2. Michael Q., that was quite an intelligent rebuttal!! About what I usually expect from your ilk. Why bother letting any facts derail your “opinions”.

    3. Randy, have you ever read my stuff? I am pretty sure that several folks find it funny that I’m now an anti-vaxer.

      I’m vaxed, boosted, and still wearing a mask in public. We stayed home for a long time until everyone in my family could get vaccinated. We stayed home again during the worst of Omicron.

      If the numbers tell us when to mask up and restrict activities, they also have to tell us when to open up. Based on everything I am seeing, those hospitals should be emptying out soon enough. We have vaccines. We have antivirals. The time to stay home to protect the willfully unvaccinated has passed.

      https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2022/02/end-coronavirus-restrictions/621627/

    4. Joe,

      I’m sure I’ve probably read your comments since I’m a frequent commentor myself, but, no, I wasn’t aware that you are not an anti-vaxxer.

      I’m happy you took the responsible road for yourself, your family, and the public at large with whom we all interact.

      Which makes it sort of interesting that you were so quick to insult with “…sky is falling, head-spinning, liberal progressive sheep”. So, which is it – are you as reasonable as you claim in your post or do you attack anyone that suggests we take it just a bit slower than “Open everything up now, and don’t tell my kid he has to wear a mask in school”, etc.?

      I, too, am sick of being careful, wearing a mask in close spaces, not feeling entirely comfortable going to a sporting event or a concert – though I’ve done some of those things sparingly since I am vaccinated and boosted. It sucks.

      What angers me most of all is we didn’t have to have such a crappy two+ years of this had politics not gotten in the way of the sensible step of getting vaccinated. So, it’s ironic that the people who want to end all the restrictions are the same ones that caused us to have to be in this situation.

      But my point was as I stated. Deaths have not slowed down – they are still at a peak. Hospitalizations are also at a peak and the # of empty ER beds is miniscule. You even say, “those hospitals *should be* emptying out *soon*.” Well, that’s *likely* true. But it is factually correct to say there aren’t yet.

      I advocate to go just a little slower than the apparent trend of dropping the whole thing as if this is completely over. It isn’t – not quite yet.

  2. Joe,

    I’m sure I’ve probably read your comments since I’m a frequent commentor myself, but, no, I wasn’t aware that you are not an anti-vaxxer.

    I’m happy you took the responsible road for yourself, your family, and the public at large with whom we all interact.

    Which makes it sort of interesting that you were so quick to insult with “…sky is falling, head-spinning, liberal progressive sheep”. So, which is it – are you as reasonable as you claim in your post or do you attack anyone that suggests we take it just a bit slower than “Open everything up now, and don’t tell my kid he has to wear a mask in school”, etc.?

    I, too, am sick of being careful, wearing a mask in close spaces, not feeling entirely comfortable going to a sporting event or a concert – though I’ve done some of those things sparingly since I am vaccinated and boosted. It sucks.

    What angers me most of all is we didn’t have to have such a crappy two+ years of this had politics not gotten in the way of the sensible step of getting vaccinated. So, it’s ironic that the people who want to end all the restrictions are the same ones that caused us to have to be in this situation.

    But my point was as I stated. Deaths have not slowed down – they are still at a peak. Hospitalizations are also at a peak and the # of empty ER beds is miniscule. You even say, “those hospitals *should be* emptying out *soon*.” Well, that’s *likely* true. But it is factually correct to say there aren’t yet.

    I advocate to go just a little slower than the apparent trend of dropping the whole thing as if this is completely over. It isn’t – not quite yet.

    1. First, I don’t get the double quotes.

      Second, I never said that. You have me confused with what Michael Q wrote.

      Third, I have no issues with giving people hope.

    2. Joe B. – Please accept my apology. As you may have noticed, a poor night’s sleep caused me to double post twice on this thread, and then confuse which person said what. I agree completely with your initial post. The infection rate is declining, and, with that trend, it is expected hospitalizations and deaths will decline and we can move to a much more open society. Again, my bad.

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