Articles

State prevention program helps Children’s Bureau enter new areas, lift budget

Since its origins as the Widows and Orphans Asylum in 1851, the Children’s Bureau has been working to
fix broken families in Indianapolis. Now the local not-for-profit has expanded its reach into 37 Indiana
counties–growing its budget 22 percent in the process. But the agency remains focused on Marion County, where it’s building
a $9.2 million service center at 16th and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. streets.

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Charitable giving becomes bigger part of event celebrations

Kathryn Morgan and Richard Cimera met at a dog park in Greenwood, where Cimera’s basset hound won over Morgan’s shy Labrador
and boxer mix. And the owners soon followed suit, dating and then marrying on June 13. When the Greenwood couple planned their
wedding, they wanted a way to share a bit of their happiness. So, in lieu of party favors, they made a donation to an animal-welfare
organization.

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When work no longer satisfies, execs answer charity’s call

When Jim Cotterill became president of the newly formed Hoosier Christian Foundation in August, it capped off six years of
soul-searching for the Indianapolis entrepreneur. Cotterill represents growing numbers of local business professionals who
have diverted their time and talent to charity and service.

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Charity alliances in United Way’s shadow seek their share

Once a year, the CEO implores employees to sign pledge cards to the United Way. Local health and human services agencies that
benefit wait to redeem your tax-deductible gift. But others are preaching there’s another path to charitable-giving heaven.
Lesser-known federations continue to nip at the heels of the United Way establishment in the workplace.

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Charities struggle to cultivate donors

Attracting people under 40 with money to give is one of the latest challenges faced by not-for-profit organizations. As fund-raisers
look toward cultivating the next generation of supporters, they see a younger generation that appears less inclined to do
so.

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