Articles

College costs must be controlled

Colleges must control costs so that students, particularly those from low-income families, can afford higher education without
going into tremendous debt.

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Central Indiana colleges on alert to slow spending

Most colleges and universities in central
Indiana are being especially frugal because the value of their university endowments has plunged along with the market,donations
may decrease, and enrollment may decline, due to lack of student loan availability.

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Martin professor’s ouster sparks student protests

Martin University students upset over the firing of a popular professor are staging protests over the direction the school has taken under new President Algeania Freeman. Freeman in January replaced the Rev. Boniface Hardin, a Benedictine monk who founded the inner-city school 30 years ago. She since has roiled many faculty members and students by letting go employees-many times without reason, they contend-as part of a strategy to cut costs. IBJ reported their concerns in July. But the Oct. 20…

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Tough economy touching all industries, but some are hurting more than others

Stock markets are falling, jobs are disappearing, and the outlook for the economy seems grim. Banks, real estate developers,
retailers and manufacturers are taking the worst hits, but all types of businesses in central Indiana are hurting. From health
care to technology, education to philanthropy, every industry is trying to take the setbacks in stride.

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IUPUI faces tough decisions over aging sports facilities

From 1979 to 1982, IUPUI inherited three world-class athletic facilities that have since hosted Olympic trials and world-record performances by top-flight amateur and professional athletes. But that inheritance has turned into a financial albatross around the university’s neck. It’s grappling with how to pay for their upkeep and the improvements necessary to keep the facilities–and the city–in the hunt for high-profile sporting events.

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New Martin University president draws ire

In less than four months, new Martin University President Algeania Freeman said, she hit her two main objectives for the state’s
only predominantly black university: cut costs and increase fund raising. But her whirlwind of activity
has not come without controversy.

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Candidates surface for IU’s athletic director job

Well-known names are bubbling to the top as speculation heats up about who will replace embattled Indiana University Athletic
Director Rick Greenspan and how much money the job will command. Greenspan announced June 26 that he’ll step down at the end
of the year. The decision came after the NCAA added to the list of charges facing IU’s men’s basketball program over rules
violations under former Coach Kelvin Sampson.

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Ivy Tech ex-president repays $20,000 following audit of expenses

Retired Ivy Tech Community College President Gerald Lamkin has repaid nearly $20,000 after a review of the college foundation’s
expense-reimbursement policy uncovered bills that had been paid for him without proper documentation. College and foundation
officials call the accounting lapse and Lamkin’s inability to produce receipts for all the submitted expenses an “innocent
oversight” and have implemented a revised policy with tighter controls.

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College endowments growing, but so is tuition

Endowments at Indiana colleges and universities are soaring, due in part to impressive investment returns in recent years.
The swelling coffers here and across the nation are stoking the debate over whether universities should be using more of their
wealth to hold down tuition increases.

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Sampson scandal may repel IU donors

Based on 50 conversations IU Foundation President Curt Simic had with donors the week after news broke of the potential firing
of men’s basketball coach Kelvin Sampson over alleged NCAA improprieties, the chief of Indiana University’s philanthropic
arm says he has little fear the latest athletic department controversy will affect financial support to the school.

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Retiring baby boomers create openings for new grads

Students donning caps and gowns this May will find jobs aplenty, college career officers and others say. Some industries–like
health care, accounting, engineering, computer science and sales–are more flush with jobs than others. But students receiving
liberal arts degrees also are in high demand because of their well-rounded education.

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