Articles

ICVA unlikely to seek loan to pay for enhanced marketing

The idea of the not-for-profit Indianapolis Convention & Visitors Association taking out a loan was not warmly received by
city officials. And financial institutions were less than thrilled with the idea given the ICVA’s diminishing revenue
and increasing costs.

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ICVA: Stadium’s retractable roof worth the cost

Three music events with direct visitor spending estimated at $28 million that were hosted at Lucas Oil Stadium offer proof,
city officials said, that the expense of the retractable roof and other features of the $720 million facility are paying off.

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ICVA might take out loan to market city for conventions

The Indianapolis Convention & Visitors Association is so desperate for more marketing funding, the organization charged
with promoting the city as a convention and tourism destination is considering taking out a loan. While that
would be the last resort, ICVA CEO Don Welsh said it is one he will have to consider if the money can’t be raised through
local taxes.

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EDITORIAL: Partisan games plague council

The City-County Council wisely averted disaster for the Capital Improvement Board Aug. 10 by voting to raise the city’s
hotel tax from 9 percent to 10 percent, but the razor-thin vote was another disappointing case of elected officials making
decisions based on partisanship rather than good judgment.

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CIB regrouping, still aiming to close budget hole

The beleaguered Indianapolis Capital Improvement Board has whittled its anticipated 2010 deficit of $47 million to only $5 million. But how it slashed $7 million since the end of the Legislative special session and how it proposes to close the final gap are a mystery.

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EDITORIAL: Leadership void stymied special legislative session

The legislative session that concluded June 30 with passage of a two-year budget left a bad taste in our mouths. For starters,
legislators lacked the courage to tackle local government reform—even though cash-strapped units of government
desperately need the millions of dollars in savings they would generate. In short, they put political cronyism ahead of the
interests of the state.

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$65M development deal would cost Capital Improvement Board

The Capital Improvement Board could be forced to give up one of its most profitable assets so the city can pull off a $65-million
public-private downtown development deal. The city has agreed to help a developer revitalize the vacant former Bank One operations
center in part by acquiring an adjacent
parking garage for $18.5 million.

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$65M downtown development deal raises questions

A $65 million public-private plan for the redevelopment of a vacant downtown office building is raising eyebrows for its unusual
approach and potential risk to taxpayers. The plan calls for a private developer to acquire the former Bank One operations
center, surface parking lots and an adjacent
parking garage from a private owner for $18.5 million, then sell the 1,680-space garage to the city for $18.5 million.

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Tourism should not be our focus

If a city really wants to attract people to its city (to live and visit), it has to become a better city, but to become a better city it has to know what it is and what it wants to be and what it can be.

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Stop funding CIB

Well-intentioned or not, competent or not, the so-called “leaders” [sports columnist Bill Benner] referenced in your [May 4] column failed miserably in representing the best interests of taxpayers and instead presided over an unconscionable transfer of wealth from “We the people” to a small number of professional sports owners and players.

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City built on leadership, cooperation is in danger

No matter how the Capital Improvement Board funding mess plays out, we’re left with resentment coming from all directions
and an unprecedented splintering of the long-standing bipartisan cooperation that helped propel our city forward.

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