Indianapolis Business Journal

SEPT. 9-15, 2022

A year after many of Indiana’s large corporations and health system began firing employees who didn’t get COVID-19 vaccines, the lawsuits are beginning to pile up. John Russell reports on the continuing split over mandatory vaccinations. Also in this week’s issue, Taylor Wooten explains why the city of Indianapolis is struggling with a big staffing shortage, with nearly one-fifth of its positions unfilled. And Dave Lindquist has a ditty about two music competitions with great international reputations that are trying to raise their profiles in their home city of Indianapolis.

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A year later, fight continues over vaccine mandates

In recent months, current and former employees of drugmaker Eli Lilly and Co., medical-equipment maker Roche Diagnostics and health care system Ascension St. Vincent have filed suit in federal district court, claiming their religious views and civil liberties were violated.

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OpinionBack to Top

Mickey Kim: Why ‘free’ is the most dangerous word in investing

A number of words/phrases used to pitch investment products are red flags and should cause you to raise your antenna and activate your BS detector. These would include “bulletproof,” “guaranteed,” “high return/low-no risk,” “easy money” or “next hot thing.” However, the most dangerous word of all is “free.” It sounds harmless and innocuous. Who doesn’t […]

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Cecil Bohanon and John Horowitz: Studies show, economics is a major that pays

We economics professors love our bragging rights. At Ball State, we advertise our economics major as “the major that pays.” Numerous studies back this up. Undergraduates majoring in economics earn more than those majoring in most other fields of study, the exception being engineering majors. Economics majors consistently earn more than other business school majors. […]

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Letters: An idea to balance the federal budget

If we implement this idea, we might balance the budget—or come really close to doing so. Charge businesses 25 cents to send one email to any email address. Don’t charge individuals or not-for-profits. Today, I got 488 emails in my junk box. It takes me time to sort those. Most are marketing spam or phishing […]

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