Articles

Memory Bank: Demolition day

Sections of The English Theatre, formerly known as The English Hotel and Opera House, are demolished in this May 1949 photo. The Victorian-era building stood at the northwest quadrant of Monument Circle from 1880 until it was razed to be replaced by a J.C. Penney store (later the Anthem Inc. headquarters). The building was constructed […]

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Memory bank: Halloween happenings

Irvington has celebrated Halloween for decades. The first Irvington Halloween festival occurred in 1927 and was hosted by the Irvington Commercial & Welfare Association. Adults and children marched down East Washington Street in costumes, and the evening concluded with a street dance. After a few successful years, Halloween festivities in Irvington died out but have […]

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Memory Bank: Laid to rest

Casket bearers carry Marcus C. Stewart Sr., the longtime editor and publisher of The Indianapolis Recorder, to his final resting place at Crown Hill Cemetery following his death on March 26, 1983, at age 78. Stewart’s father, George Pheldon Stewart, founded the Black-oriented paper in 1895. Growing up, Marcus Stewart worked on the paper, handling […]

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A historic tavern

Pictured is the Slippery Noodle Inn in the 1940s. The historic tavern, located at 372 S. Meridian St., was originally founded as the Tremont House in 1850. The tavern is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is Indiana’s oldest, continually operated bar. Also, the building is Indianapolis’ oldest commercial building still standing. […]

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Memory Bank: Another new home

Pictured are the City-County Building and the Marion County Courthouse before it was demolished in June 1962. Marion County court employees had moved into the new City-County Building earlier that year, vacating the 86-year-old Baroque-style courthouse that was built in 1876 (the second Marion County courthouse). The Richard G. Lugar Plaza now sits where that […]

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Memory Bank: Spanning Market Street

Market Square Arena was built in 1974 and was the home stadium to two teams—the Indiana Pacers and the Indianapolis Racers, a franchise in the World Hockey Association. The Pacers played for a quarter century at Market Square, their second home after the State Fairgrounds Coliseum, including through the team’s transition from the American Basketball […]

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Memory Bank: A centennial celebration

1916 On Oct. 12, 1916, President Woodrow Wilson and his wife, Edith Bolling Galt Wilson, visited Indianapolis as part of the Centennial Highway Day Celebration. In this photo, Wilson stands beside Gov. Samuel M. Ralston and Indianapolis Mayor Joseph E. Bell to view the Centennial Highway Day parade of automobiles from the Soldiers and Sailors […]

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Governmental groundbreaking

Government officials broke ground on the City-County Building on Oct. 30, 1959. Pictured from left are J. Wesley Brown, president of the county commissioners; William A. Hanley, president of the building authority’s board of directors; and Mayor Charles H. Boswell. The building opened in 1962. Now, Indianapolis officials have released a request for information seeking […]

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A supersonic plane

Circa 1980s An Air France Concorde commercial jet makes a stop at Indianapolis International Airport in the 1980s. The unique plane was a supersonic passenger airliner, jointly built by manufacturers in Great Britain and France, that flew trans-Atlantic flights in half the time it took other commercial airliners. Only 20 jets were ever built. The […]

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Memory Bank: Riding in style

1952 Dwight D. Eisenhower rides in a decked-out convertible vehicle around Monument Circle on Sept. 9, 1952. Eisenhower, who would go on to serve two terms as the 34th president, from 1953 to 1961, was campaigning throughout the country in his race against Adlai Stevenson. Eisenhower won the state with 58% of the vote and […]

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Building upgrades

The Walker Building was erected in 1927, eight years after the death of Madam C.J. Walker on May 25, 1919. The building, at 617 Indiana Ave., included a theater, drugstore, manufacturing company, beauty shop, ballroom and offices. It was saved from demolition in the 1970s and was restored in the 1980s, reopening in 1988 as […]

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Submarine on Monument Circle

A captured Japanese submarine sits on display on Monument Circle in July 1943. Named HA-19, the submarine was one of five Japanese midget submarines involved in the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941. U.S. forces captured the submarine, and it was sent around the country to war-bond rallies from 1942 to 1945. Those who wanted […]

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Memory Bank: The place to be

The Claypool was at one time the principal destination for political and business conventions, meetings and other events downtown.

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Memory Bank: Rallying for a baseball team

A crowd of people gathers in July 1985 on Monument Circle for a rally to bring a Major League Baseball franchise to Indianapolis at a time it seemed the league was looking to expand. After the Baltimore Colts moved to the city in the early ’80s and the Indiana Pacers survived the ABA-NBA merger, many […]

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Memory Bank: Closed Riverside Amusement Park

This photograph shows an aging and worn roller coaster at the former Riverside Amusement Park in the 1970s. Located adjacent to Riverside City Park, at West 30th Street between the White River and the Central Canal, Riverside Amusement Park was open from 1903 to 1970. Several factors led to the closure, including white flight, suburbanization […]

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Under water

A flood in March 1913 left this unidentified street in Indianapolis under water. In this photo, the water rises above the horse’s hooves and covers the road and sidewalks entirely. Downpours began on Easter Sunday in 1913, and over three days—March 23-26—six inches of rain fell on the Circle City. At least 25 people died […]

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Memory Bank: Relaxing on the steps at Crispus Attucks

A group of students talk and read in front of an entrance to Crispus Attucks High School in this photo from the 1939 edition of the school’s yearbook. The school, at Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and West 12th streets, just northwest of downtown, opened in 1927 as a segregated high school for the community’s […]

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Memory Bank: Municipal Airport preceded IND

Three men—Indianapolis city employee Charles Hack, “Presto Lite” pilot Dick Knox and an unnamed American Airlines pilot—pose with a small plane at the Indianapolis Municipal Airport in the 1940s. The airport, which opened on Sept. 24, 1931, was later renamed Weir Cook Airport after Col. Harvey Weir Cook—a World War I flying ace from Indiana […]

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