Articles

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The Interview Issue: Parker Sawyers

When Indianapolis native Parker Sawyers got the call to audition to play on-screen the man who would become POTUS, he found himself with the biggest challenge of his budding career.

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The Interview Issue: Sue Ellspermann

Sue Ellspermann has been a lot of things in her life: industrial engineer, business consultant, university teacher, state legislator and—from 2013 until earlier this year—Indiana’s lieutenant governor. Now, the southwestern Indiana native has a new gig: president of Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana, which she started July 1.

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The Interview Issue: Monica Peck and Courtney Cole

Noblesville natives Monica Peck and Courtney Cole became the sixth-generation owners of Hare Chevrolet when they bought it from their parents in 2008. Now, thanks in part to a snappy ad campaign, sales have nearly tripled. But their biggest battle has been off the lot: Cole is battling cancer.

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The Interview Issue: Billie Dragoo

Founder of RepuCare, a 200-employee medical staffing company, Billie Dragoo has become one of central Indiana’s most fervent advocates for women. She’s a past CEO and board chairwoman of the National Association of Women Business Owners and co-founder of the Indiana Conference for Women.

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The Interview Issue: J.R. Todd

Indianapolis resident J.R. Todd is one of the leading drag racers in the nation and was the first African-American to win a Top Fuel competition. But the road to the top has been winding.

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The Interview Issue: Jay Brammer

Businessman Jay Brammer’s adult daughter was diagnosed with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis in January 2014. Since then, he’s emerged as one of the top fundraisers for the Indiana chapter of the Multiple Sclerosis Society and expects to raise more than $125,000 for the group this year alone.

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The Interview Issue: Robert Riesbeck

Just two months into the job, HHGregg CEO Robert Riesbeck believes the struggling retailer “still has long-term viability.” He aims to boost results in part by doubling-down on appliances—a strategy that includes opening more locations of the super-premium Fine Lines chain.

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The Interview Issue: Shelly Towns

Shelly Towns says she’s very comfortable with ambiguity and a fast pace—and that’s come in handy as she’s worked to help turn around Angie’s List. “I’m fine with, to some degree, figuring out things as we go,” she said.

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The Interview Issue: Luke Britt

When state and local officials won’t cough up records they owe the public or try to close a meeting that should be open, Indiana Public Access Counselor Luke Britt steps in. He uses a combination of education and formal opinions to try to get governmental agencies to follow the law.

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The Interview Issue: Thomas Main & Peter George

Once highly successful restaurateurs, Thomas Main and Peter George fell on some tough times in the 2000s and ended up as housemates. That’s when they started plotting a return to the industry as partners in a new venue that became the popular restaurant Tinker Street.

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The Interview Issue: Jane Reiman

Opposition to a proposed horse track in Carmel is what drove Jane Reiman to run for mayor of the Hamilton County city in 1979. Almost four decades later, she’s back working at the city—with a little less responsibility but still plenty of passion.

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The Interview Issue: Terri Cope-Walton

In 2013, Terri Cope-Walton—a broadcast journalist almost by accident—became Indianapolis’ first black television news director. She compares a news show to a picnic: It’s only good if there are a variety of options to consume.

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The Interview Issue: Angela Smith-Jones

As the city’s deputy mayor of economic development, Angela Smith-Jones, 49, spends her days trying to create more jobs for Indianapolis. In the evenings, she unwinds by cooking at home or enjoying an intriguing meal at a restaurant.

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